What is the state penalty formula for unpaid wages in a suit against employer?

Asked over 2 years ago - Medford, OR

if employer did not pay employee wages at least every 35 days, I understand there is a penalty formula in state of Oregon. employer did not pay wages. I am considering a suit? tried to look it up online. does anyone know?

Attorney answers (1)

  1. David A Schuck

    Contributor Level 13

    1

    Lawyer agrees

    Answered . The reason you had difficulty locating your answer online, is that there is no specific penalty that attaches to that statute. Instead, there are other provisions which the penalty attaches to that the failure to pay on payday may invoke. First, all minimum wages are due on payday. When not paid a penalty can attach. Second, if you worked overtime, then you could have an overtime civil penalty. In addition to the wages and penalties, you could recover your attorney fees and costs of suit. For this reason, some law firms offer free consultations, and take such wage claim lawsuits on a contingency fee basis, essentially being paid by your employer to win your case.

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