What is the general amount someone (tenant) can sue a landlord for, when the LL commited fraud or misrepresentation to the tenan

Asked over 1 year ago - Lodi, NJ

What is the general amount someone (tenant) can sue a landlord for, when the LL commited fraud or misrepresentation to the tenant?

Attorney answers (4)

  1. Steven Todd Keppler

    Contributor Level 14

    4

    Lawyers agree

    1

    Answered . There is no "general amount" you sue for. Suits for damages are based on your actual damages - how much did you lose? That's what you sue for. In some cases, there are statutory multipliers (such as the New Jersey Consumer Fraud Act, which gives 3x damages). In other cases, attorney fees are recoverable for successful plaintiffs.

    Without knowing a great deal more about your possible suit, it's impossible to be more specific. If you're contemplating a suit against your LL, you should consider speaking with an attorney.

    The foregoing is not legal advice, and nothing in the foregoing shall be deemed to create an attorney client... more
  2. Michael T Millar

    Pro

    Contributor Level 19

    2

    Lawyers agree

    1

    Answered . As my colleagues have indicated, there is no statutory penalty for fraud. Rather, under the consumer fraud act - which is applicable in some cases to landlord tenant relationships - your actual damages would be tripled and the landlord would be made to pay your attorney fees.

    If this answer was helpful, please mark it as helpful or as a best answer. This answer is for general education... more
  3. Matthew C Simon

    Pro

    Contributor Level 18

    1

    Lawyer agrees

    1

    Answered . I agree with my colleague. There is no general amount. Fraud could warrant treble or punitive damages. Attorneys' fees and costs may also be permitted depending on the facts of the case.

    Many attorneys, such as myself, will offer you a free 30 minute consultation to discuss all of the details of your case and advise you of your options.

    Good luck.

    The above is general information only and is not legal advice. The information provided does not form an attorney-... more
  4. Anthony J Van Zwaren

    Pro

    Contributor Level 15

    1

    Lawyer agrees

    Answered . It is difficult to gauge any answer in terms of monetary damages. Compensatory damages would only cover you for any actual losses you suffered, which would likely be related to what the amount of rent you pay. While the Consumer Protection Act provides for triple damages, you haveto determine what the damages actually were. If you face eviction because of some violations by the landlord (such as having an illegal occupancy) you may be entitled to six months of rent for relocation assistance. But there is not enough information provided as to what your case is. Also be advised that a suit for fraud must be plead with specific facts not general allegations.

    DISCLAIMER: This communication does not create an attorney-client relationship and is not legal advice unless you... more

Can't find what you're looking for? Ask a Lawyer

Get free answers from experienced attorneys.

 

Ask now

29,501 answers this week

3,163 attorneys answering

Ask a Lawyer

Get answers from top-rated lawyers.

  • It's FREE
  • It's easy
  • It's anonymous

29,501 answers this week

3,163 attorneys answering