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What is MMI and why did it stop my workers comp benefits?

Dallas, TX |

My workers comp assigned doctor released me for full duty because he said I have reached MMI, but I am still not physically able to do my job. Workers comp has stopped paying my weekly benefits because I was released for full duty, but told me they will continue to pay all of my injury related medical bills. I went to an impairment evaluation today and have not gotten the results back yet.

What do I do now? I can't afford to pay my bills without the weekly checks.

Attorney Answers 3


MMI is an acronym for Maximum Medical Improvement. it doesn't mean that you can now do what you could do before you were injured. It simply means that you do not require any further medical care. I strongly suggest that you hire an experienced local Worker's Compensation attorney to explain your options and make certain that you do what is in your best interest at this critical juncture.

If this information has been helpful, please indicate by clicking the up icon. Legal Disclaimer: Mr. Candiano is licensed to practice law in Illinois and Indiana. The response herein is not legal advice and does not create an attorney/client relationship. The response is in the form of legal education and is intended to provide general information about the matter within the question. Links:

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When you are deemed MMI, your Temporary Disability benefits end, and you are converted to Permanent Disability status if there is residual impairment. That is why your benefits were either reduced or ended.

We give free general concepts to be helpful, but you should give ALL your facts to a licensed Attorney in your state before you RELY upon any legal advice.

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What does your own doctor say? If your doctor disagrees and feels that you are not ready to return to work then the worker’s comp. carrier will begin paying you PPD (if assigned by the worker’s comp. doctor). If the comp. doctor assigned 0% permanency then the comp. carrier will stop paying benefits.

If your doctor still has you on work restrictions then your employer will likely not take you back to work until you are fully healed and you will have no money coming in. This would be a good time to get a worker’s comp. attorney if you do not already have one.

Good luck.

DISCLAIMER: David J. McCormick is licensed to practice law in the State of Wisconsin and this answer is being provided for informational purposes only because the laws of your jurisdiction may differ. This answer based on general legal principles and is not intended for the purpose of providing specific legal advice or opinions. Under no circumstances does this answer constitute the establishment of an attorney-client relationship.

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