WHAT IF YOU GET "MARRIED" IN A COMMON LAW STATE IS IT RECOGNIZED IN STATES THAT DO NOT RECOGNIZE THAT

Asked over 1 year ago - Webster, MA

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Attorney answers (3)

  1. Douglas Richard Lloyd Jr.

    Contributor Level 11

    3

    Lawyers agree

    Answered . I can't speak for every state, but in Massachusetts specifically: Assuming that the marriage was validly entered into in the jurisdiction where it took place then Massachusetts will give that marriage full faith and credit and recognize it as a legal marriage.

    Douglas Lloyd is licensed to practice law in the Commonwealth of Massachusetts. Answers provided on Avvo are... more
  2. Karen M. Buckley

    Contributor Level 11

    2

    Lawyers agree

    Answered . It is not clear if you entered into a marriage ceremony, or if you are referencing a common law marriage recognized by another state. You will need to produce a valid marriage certificate to have the marriage recognized in MA.

    This answer is for general informational purposes only and does not create an attorney-client relationship.
    Paula Brown Sinclair
    Paula Brown Sinclair, Family Law Attorney - Twin Falls, ID
    Posted over 1 year ago.

    Wait a minute. You are saying my 1992 Idaho non-ceremonial marriage (which involves no certificate of any kind, but satisfied Idaho law at the time) is not recognized in Massachusetts?

    Karen M. Buckley
    Karen M. Buckley, Marriage / Prenuptials Lawyer - Newton, MA
    Posted over 1 year ago.

    You would need something from ID showing there is a legally recognized marriage.

  3. Paula Brown Sinclair

    Contributor Level 20

    1

    Lawyer agrees

    Answered . The traditional rule is that a marriage validly commenced in one state is recognized as valid in all other states as a matter of comity. The present day reality of some states recognizing as valid a same-sex marriage has where other states have passed laws refusing to recognize such marriages has made the traditional less universal and absolute. A marriage commenced at "common law" is as valid as a ceremonial marriage if commenced in one of the few states that still recognize non-ceremonial marriage and the requirements of that state are met.

    Best wishes for a favorable outcome, and please remember to designate a best answer.

    This answer is offered as a public service for general information only and may not be relied upon as legal advice.

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