WHAT IF YOU BROKE INTO YOUR FATHERS HOUSE AND TOOK $10,000 DOLLARS WHAT DO YOU THINK WILL BE THE OUTCOME?

Asked almost 3 years ago - Indianapolis, IN

BIG SCREEN TVS, JEWERLY, AND OTHER ITEMS WERE TAKEN OUT?

Attorney answers (3)

  1. Steven Zalewski

    Pro

    Contributor Level 13

    5

    Lawyers agree

    Answered . In every state that is a crime and when you are caught and you will be caught you will go to jail.

  2. James Brian Thomas

    Contributor Level 14

    4

    Lawyers agree

    Answered . Not sure why this is posted under the Wills subject area, but perhaps the father in this scenario is deceased. If you broke into anyone's home, whether that person is living or dead, and took these items, you've committed theft and likely a string of other offenses, both criminal and civil. It's illegal everywhere, and none of the outcomes are good. I'm also not sure if you're posting as a concerned bystander, an interested party or if you are actually the person that engaged in these acts. If you did these things, you might carefully consider that the Internet and this forum are hardly confidential, and admitting something here is just as bad (worse even) as walking out your front door and yelling it as loud as you can.

    This answer does not constitute legal advice. I am admitted to practice law in the State of Texas only, and make... more
  3. Angela Mary Kinley

    Pro

    Contributor Level 12

    4

    Lawyers agree

    Answered . If you broke into the home, and you did not live there and no permission to be on the property, you could be charged with burglary as well as theft for stealing the money. You would likely face criminal prosecution in the event your father reported the incident to the police. Depending on the specific state law, you could face prison time if convicted of the felony offenses of burglary (or your state's equivalent charge) and theft by taking. Depending on your history, you could serve consecutive sentences, meaning the time would run independently of one another, or if you are a first time offender, you may receive a concurrent sentence, meaning the sentences on each count would run at the same time, and be eligible for first-offender treatment.

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