What happens when you violate court supervision?

Asked 12 months ago - Plainfield, IL

I was put on court supervision for a class a mistometer and was recently caught shoplifting.

Attorney answers (4)

  1. J. Richard Kulerski

    Contributor Level 20

    3

    Lawyers agree

    Answered . If the court determines that you violated the supervision by virtue of the second incident, it can sentence you on the first case as though the supervision never occurred.

  2. Dean George Tsourakis

    Pro

    Contributor Level 20

    3

    Lawyers agree

    Answered . If they catch it you could be facing a violation as well as the new charge.

  3. Peter Christian Komar

    Contributor Level 14

    1

    Lawyer agrees

    Answered . It depends on the judge. Hire an experience local attorney.

  4. Martin Samuel Lascola

    Pro

    Contributor Level 13

    1

    Lawyer agrees

    Answered . If you are arrested for a new offense during the period that you have been placed on Court Supervision, you risk having a violation (or Petition to revoke sentence) filed against you by the State. If this allegation is proven, you can be re-sentenced to either Conditional Discharge, Probation, or county jail time. Normally, once a violation/petition is filed, the Judge will continue the proceeding to see what happens on the new arrest - meaning, whether you are found guilty (by either plea or trial) or if the case is either dismissed or you are found Not Guilty. Obviously, if you either plea or are found guilty of the new offense, the State will have a much easier time proving the violation. If the new charge is dismissed (or you are found Not Guilty after trial) you have a chance that the Violation action will not be proven & you may remain of Court Supervision for the balance of the original sentence.

Can't find what you're looking for? Ask a Lawyer

Get free answers from experienced attorneys.

 

Ask now

24,770 answers this week

2,938 attorneys answering

Ask a Lawyer

Get answers from top-rated lawyers.

  • It's FREE
  • It's easy
  • It's anonymous

24,770 answers this week

2,938 attorneys answering