What happens when i'm required to attend a traffic hearing?

Asked about 4 years ago - San Jose, CA

I was issued a citation ticket for a 1).correctable 12500(a)- unlicensed driver - misdemeanor & 2). 23123(a)- using a cell phone -infraction and required to appear in traffic court. I had a CA driver's license once but has expired since '07 & couldn't renew coz of my status. What will happen when i appear in the hearing? I know i have to pay the fine for the cell phone infraction but what about the driver's license?

Attorney answers (2)

  1. Roland Xavier Tiemann

    Contributor Level 14

    1

    Best Answer
    chosen by asker

    Answered . What should happen is the judge will say you are charged with 12500(a) and 23123(a) and that the fine for both is a certain amount of money. You pay the money and you are on your way. Since the 12500 is correctable, you will usually be given the option to get your license come back to court to show the judge you got your license. If you do this, the 12500 could be dismissed or reduced and the fine could be lowered. If you have priors, is you may have some problems. If you have immigration issues, you should hire an attorney to handle your case. Because an attorney can go to court for you and handle the whole thing so you don't have to go to court. You could probably find an attorney to handle this case for less than $1000.

  2. John M. Kaman

    Pro

    Contributor Level 20

    Answered . What do you mean you couldn't renew because of your status? What status? To clear the 12500 with the least inconvenience to yourself you'll have to get a valid license. Are there obstacles preventing you from doing that?

Can't find what you're looking for? Ask a Lawyer

Get free answers from experienced attorneys.

 

Ask now

24,152 answers this week

2,751 attorneys answering

Ask a Lawyer

Get answers from top-rated lawyers.

  • It's FREE
  • It's easy
  • It's anonymous

24,152 answers this week

2,751 attorneys answering

Legal Dictionary

Don't speak legalese? We define thousands of terms in plain English.

Browse our legal dictionary