Skip to main content

What happens when filing Bankruptcy to a commerciasl lease evicition process?

Jacksonville, FL |

We have a small business which has a lease. We also know eviciton will be served on us shortly. When filing bankruptcy, will it provide us any protection, even if just temporary?

Attorney Answers 3


  1. Best answer

    If at all possible, file the bankruptcy (in the name of the legal entity that is the Lessee) before the eviction case is filed. An automatic stay will issue when the bankruptcy is filed, however, landlords can seek relief from this and the amount of time you have before that is granted will vary by area and jurisdiction. You may have to provide security for payment of rent. If the business is at all viable going forward, consider filing a Chapter 13 (if it is an individual d/b/a) or a Chapter 11 if a corporate entity is the Lessee. You will have more flexability in dealing with the Landlord than in a Chapter 7 Liquidation.
    This area of bankruptcy proceedure can be complex and you will need a competent attorney.


  2. Contact a bankruptcy attorney in your area immediately--today--every situation is different. There is no way to tell what YOU mean by 'protection'--or whether being 'protected' temporarily is even in your best long term interests. SOrry you couldn't get a specific answer, but your situation depends on many factors you did not post. Call your county or state bar association IMMEDIATELY and request referral to an attorney in your area who practices bankruptcy --there are many.

    READ THIS BEFORE CALLING OR EMAILING ME: I am licensed to practice before the state and federal courts in Virginia. We have not established an attorney-client relationship unless we have a signed representation agreement and you have paid me. I give a 100% effort to get you on the right track with your issue. Sometimes that means legal educational information, sometimes that means counseling and non-legal guidance. You should speak with an attorney to whom you have provided all the facts, before you take steps that may impact your legal rights. I am not obligated to answer subsequent emails or phone calls unless you have hired me. I wish you the best of luck with your situation.


  3. Your personal bankruptcy would not protect the corporate business. If it is just a d/b/a, then it could for a short time. You would possibly have to deposit rent with the court upon filing. You do need an attorney who is familiar with your bankruptcy court and how it deals with this issue.

Landlord-tenant law topics

Top tips from attorneys

What others are asking

Can't find what you're looking for?

Post a free question on our public forum.

Ask a Question

- or -

Search for lawyers by reviews and ratings.

Find a Lawyer

Browse all legal topics