What happens if you don't complete your court-ordered community service hours and just don't show up to court (im a minor)?

Asked almost 2 years ago - Chicago, IL

I got arrested for a fake id by an undercover cop and the choice was either pay $1,500 or go to court (I went to court and was ordered to do 24 hours of community service in about one month) and being a minor living on my own in a separate state, I couldn't find any organizations that would let me volunteer without parental guidance. Basically my parents do not know about the situation, and I have no way of volunteering and my court date is in one week. What would happen, as a minor in Illinois, if I just didn't show up to my follow-up court date and did not complete the community service hours? I turn 18 in 4 months so will this be wiped off my record?
Thanks!

Attorney answers (2)

  1. Judy A. Goldstein

    Contributor Level 20

    1

    Lawyer agrees

    Answered . This most certainly will not go away if you fail to appear for your court date. Go to court. Ask for more time to comply with the order. Make a better effort to fulfill the community service requirements or the fine will be assessed. Try to seek legal assistance through a legal aid office. How is it that you are a minor living independently and out of state?

  2. Joseph Henry Sparacino

    Contributor Level 13

    1

    Lawyer agrees

    Answered . Do not miss your Court date. You are still under the jurisdiction of the Court. It would be better to go to Court and tell the Judge what happened as opposed to being absent and a warrant for your arrest issued. You can be committed to the Juvenile Division of the Department of Corrections beyond your 18th birthday. As I am often in Court; with your parents, call my assistant Dan London at 312807-3990 to set up a private telephone consultation. At the consultation we all can discuss the confidential details we need to craft a strategic plan. These details should not be broadcast over the Internet.

    This is a general answer and does not address the specifics of your individual case. To give the specific answer... more

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