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What does robbery (PBL) mean regarding an armed robbery sentence in Florida?

Clearwater, FL |

My friend was charged with 3 counts of armed robbery, now he is charged with one count of robbery (PBL) in Florida. What does (PBL) mean?

Attorney Answers 5


  1. In Florida, PBL means "punishable by life." When used in conjunction with a robbery charge it usually means he is charged with robbery using either a dangerous weapon or a firearm. The charge of punishable by life robbery does not mean he will get life, it is the MAXIMUM he could get. Again, in Florida the Florida Department of Corrections Criminal Punishment Score sheet governs the minimum and maximum sentence he may face. This scoresheet is based upon his current charge, his past criminal history and several other factors.

    If he is charged with a PBL he needs to hire an aggressive and experienced criminal defense trial lawyer.

    If you have more questions, please feel free to email me. jriordan@rhlawfl.com


  2. Quite simply, PBL stands for "punishable by LIFE." Whoever "he" is, that person needs an experienced and aggressive Florida criminal defense attorney that is familiar with the practice of the Pinellas County criminal justice system.

    Generally speaking, a Robbery can be enhanced to a PBL Armed Robbery if a firearm is used. Furthermore, these cases generally fall under Florida 10/20/LIFE law, so while the Maximum penalty is LIFE in prison (w/o parole), there may also be a "mandatory/minimum" sentence under 10/20/LIFE. That sentence could be 10 years, 20 years or 25 to LIFE depending on the facts of the case and if/how a firearm was used.

    Please check out our website (linked below) and read the "Crimes of Violence" and "Firearms and Weapons Offenses" sections for more info.


  3. I echo the other 2 lawyers. Take the diversion program

    As for the expugement process:

    If you plead guilty to the misdemeanor you may only seal your record at first. You may expunge your record after it has been sealed for 10 years. If the felony is Nolle Prossed or dropped by the state, you may expunge immediately. Ultimately, the legal distinction between the 2 is insignificant. Both procedures allow you to "legally lie" with a few exceptions. If the sealing/expungement process is complete and the judge has signed the order granting your seal/expunge, you may answer the question “have you ever been arrested” on a college application by saying NO. This is legally correct, but if some way it is found out the college could penalize you. Something else to consider when determining how to answer the question is the current state of the internet. Once something is on the internet it can never be permanently erase once it is on the internet.

    From the time the charge is dropped and if you process the paperwork immediately, the expungement process takes 6 to 9 months. The reason for the delay if the Florida Department of Law Enforcement, who oversees the expungement process is severely backed up. The applications are processed in the order the applications are received. Currently they are processing applications from January 2009. I do about 10 to 15 expungements a month and it has been this slow for the last 2 years or so. I speculate it is related to the budget cuts throughout Florida.

    THESE COMMENTS ARE NOT LEGAL ADVICE. They are made available by the out-of-state lawyer for educational purposes only. Actual legal advice can only be provided after consultation by an attorney licensed in your jurisdiction. Answering this question does not create an attorney-client relationship or otherwise require further consultation.


  4. I echo the other 2 lawyers. Take the diversion program

    As for the expugement process:

    If you plead guilty to the misdemeanor you may only seal your record at first. You may expunge your record after it has been sealed for 10 years. If the felony is Nolle Prossed or dropped by the state, you may expunge immediately. Ultimately, the legal distinction between the 2 is insignificant. Both procedures allow you to "legally lie" with a few exceptions. If the sealing/expungement process is complete and the judge has signed the order granting your seal/expunge, you may answer the question “have you ever been arrested” on a college application by saying NO. This is legally correct, but if some way it is found out the college could penalize you. Something else to consider when determining how to answer the question is the current state of the internet. Once something is on the internet it can never be permanently erase once it is on the internet.

    From the time the charge is dropped and if you process the paperwork immediately, the expungement process takes 6 to 9 months. The reason for the delay if the Florida Department of Law Enforcement, who oversees the expungement process is severely backed up. The applications are processed in the order the applications are received. Currently they are processing applications from January 2009. I do about 10 to 15 expungements a month and it has been this slow for the last 2 years or so. I speculate it is related to the budget cuts throughout Florida.

    THESE COMMENTS ARE NOT LEGAL ADVICE. They are made available by the out-of-state lawyer for educational purposes only. Actual legal advice can only be provided after consultation by an attorney licensed in your jurisdiction. Answering this question does not create an attorney-client relationship or otherwise require further consultation.


  5. I echo the other 2 lawyers. Take the diversion program

    As for the expugement process:

    If you plead guilty to the misdemeanor you may only seal your record at first. You may expunge your record after it has been sealed for 10 years. If the felony is Nolle Prossed or dropped by the state, you may expunge immediately. Ultimately, the legal distinction between the 2 is insignificant. Both procedures allow you to "legally lie" with a few exceptions. If the sealing/expungement process is complete and the judge has signed the order granting your seal/expunge, you may answer the question “have you ever been arrested” on a college application by saying NO. This is legally correct, but if some way it is found out the college could penalize you. Something else to consider when determining how to answer the question is the current state of the internet. Once something is on the internet it can never be permanently erase once it is on the internet.

    From the time the charge is dropped and if you process the paperwork immediately, the expungement process takes 6 to 9 months. The reason for the delay if the Florida Department of Law Enforcement, who oversees the expungement process is severely backed up. The applications are processed in the order the applications are received. Currently they are processing applications from January 2009. I do about 10 to 15 expungements a month and it has been this slow for the last 2 years or so. I speculate it is related to the budget cuts throughout Florida.

    THESE COMMENTS ARE NOT LEGAL ADVICE. They are made available by the out-of-state lawyer for educational purposes only. Actual legal advice can only be provided after consultation by an attorney licensed in your jurisdiction. Answering this question does not create an attorney-client relationship or otherwise require further consultation.

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