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What does it mean when you're on deferred disposition, and now your background check shows revocation?

Ridgeway, VA |

I was assaulted by someone, and they was given deferred disposition. Now it's showing up revocation under their background. what does that mean?

Attorney Answers 3

Posted

IF a person was given a deferred disposition on an assault case and it says revocation on their background, it usually means that they violated the terms of their deferred finding and they have to go before the court to show cause why they should not be convicted. Essentially, they violated their probation and now risk having the conviction.

This is not intended to be legal advice: it is for general informational or educational purposes only. For a free consultation, visit www.dischleylaw.com.

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Posted

Even if they violated the terms of the "deferred disposition", can they still be found not guilty? I wont be there this time to give my side of the story. They going back to court over 3 different "driving without a license" and other traffic violations at two different courts, which is what violated the deferred disposition. They are already on probation, but was still given the deferred disposition. Something seems strange to me how they are always getting out of trouble and never pulling any time even though they repeatedly get into trouble.

David Joseph Dischley

David Joseph Dischley

Posted

It really depends on the reason for the revocation and how many chances the judge is willing to give them. Many judges will find them guilty if they got new charges

Posted

Probably that they violated the terms of their probation (deferred action is a form of same).

Because I was recently congratulated by an Avvo questioner for having the courage not to use a disclaimer, let me make it clear that I have always answered questions subject to the Avvo general disclaimer. The answers I give are for educational purposes and not to be relied upon for legal advice. No attorney-client relationship is intended or established by virtue of these answers.

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Posted

Generally it would mean that the individual failed to do everything he was ordered to do to have the charge dismissed. Generally though, it would simply show up as a conviction of the underlying charge. You may be able to contact the local prosecutors office to follow-up if they were involved in the case.

Please remember that if you find an answer particularly helpful, please mark it as helpful or "best answer" so that the attorneys who volunteer their time to answer these questions have feedback. This answer is only for informational purposes, is not legal advice, and does not create an attorney-client relationship. Every case is different and must be judged on its own unique facts.

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