Skip to main content

What does f degree mean in courts

Panama City, FL |

i no what the level mean i just dont understand the degree

Attorney Answers 3


  1. I need to know what context the "f" appears to properly respond to your question. However, in many courts, the letter "F" refers to a Felony.

    This answer is for informational purposes only. Nothing in this answer should be construed as creating an attorney-client relationship.


  2. Assuming that the F you're referring to means a felony, there are multiple levels (or degrees) of felonies. Third degree felonies (F3) are the least serious felonies, but are still serious crimes as any felony conviction can have life-long consequences for you. Second degree felonies (F2) are more serious, punishable by greater amounts of prison time/fines. (15 yrs/10K v. 5 yrs/5k for 3d degree felonies). First degree felonies (F1) are more serious still (30 yrs imprisonment) and any conviction for a first degree felony will carry some sort of prison time under the criminal punishment code, and some charges (such as drug trafficking charges) carry mandatory minimum prison sentences. Life felonies are punishible by life imprisonment and capital felonies are punishable by death. Additionally, there are enhanced punishments for habitual felony offenders and prison releasee reoffenders, so anyone charged with a felony should seek to retain an experienced criminal defense attorney.

    An attorney-client relationship is NOT created by the answering of this question. If you would like to discuss your matter more fully with my office, please contact me to set up an initial consultation.


  3. Each county clerk has different abbreviation, and in this case it may well mean "first". The local clerk uses F1 for a first degree felony, F3 for a third, etc.

Criminal defense topics

Top tips from attorneys

What others are asking

Can't find what you're looking for?

Post a free question on our public forum.

Ask a Question

- or -

Search for lawyers by reviews and ratings.

Find a Lawyer

Browse all legal topics