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What are the procedures for giving someone limited power of attorney to assist with surveying and selling a portion of land.

Bloomfield, CT |

The property is in another country in the West Indies my siblings and I only want this individual for a few months to have very limited power of attorney to assist us in selling a parcel of land. This includes with the surveying, and executing the bill of sales. After the property has been sold the limited power of attorney will become null. Do we have any other options.

Attorney Answers 2


  1. You need to find a lawyer in the country where the property is to guide you. Laws vary from state to state and country to country.


  2. It's impossible to say for sure without knowing which of the six or seven nations comprising the West Indies you want to use it in. In all cases, it starts with having a local attorney draft a limited power of attorney for that purpose, and making sure the acknowledgement is taken by a notary public (not attorney as commissioner of the superior court). Most of the countries represented there are party to the Apostille Convention, which means you need to then take the PoA to the secretary of the state's office in Hartford, get an apostille (certificate confirming the authority of the notary public), and that is all it will take to validate the document. That being said, a validated document is useless if the people you're presenting it to don't speak English. If the country of use is non-English-speaking, you may need to go to a local consulate for the nation of use and get a consular certified translation. If the country of use is not a party to the convention, like Jamaica, you really need to see a specialist or speak to someone at their consulate for validation required.

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