Skip to main content

What are the consequences of failure to allow a child to see the other parent on visitation schedule?

Cincinnati, OH |

The father of my child is very controlling, has stalked me, and his mother as well. He on multiple exchanges has failed to appear for my visitation. Recently, I moved out of state to get away from him and his mother's control. I will not provide an address because of his harassment. He is complaining that because I will not tell him my address that he is concerned for my daughters safety. He also has been asking for my location and an additional phone number regardless of the child being with me. I have had my child since birth and recently received only a few summer visits, due to the move. He feels he has the right to withhold my child from me because he cannot locate me. What can I do to protect myself from him, see my child, and fight him legally to stop his controlling acts?

The father is a seven time convicted felon for theft, identity theft, stealing, etc. My family and I have been a victim of his theft and identity use. One of his older daughters works for the court system, and he has labeled me as a bad/neglecting parent in the court system, even though I have done nothing but provide a steady, disciplined, and loving life for her. He has abused my every way but physically and continues to harass me, putting my daughter through a horrible mess and blaming me for it all. I am severely in debt with an attorney due to my previous court battle with him, which never made it to the judge. What do I need to do?

Attorney Answers 2


You have far too many questions to answer than can be done in this fashion. First and foremost, if the Court has ordered something, then you must do that act or face contempt charges. If you have justification then you must first file an appropriate motion and then seek to limit his knowledge of where you live and so on. Unfortunately, this is something that requires legal skill and the use of an attorney if you want to succeed. Emergency Custody Orders, Civil Protection Orders and Motions to Modify are some tools that appear to be pertinent to your case. You may contact me for a free telephone consult at (614)207-1673.

Disclaimer - I am a practicing attorney in Ohio. The law varies state to state. This is being offered as general legal education. There is no explicit or implicit offer to provide legal representation.

Mark as helpful

2 lawyers agree


You have extensive high conflict litigation. If you disobey Court Orders--He has the ability to file for Contempt, and based upon the change in circumstances--may even file to change custody. Call your existing Lawyer--get on top of your fee issue--and get into Court to fix the problem. You can't ignore Court Orders--they are not "suggestions"--they're ORDERS. Good Luck.

The answers to questions provided in response to the request for assistance are general in nature, and reflect information which is primarily based upon general legal principals, and may additionally reflect Ohio principles of legal practice, as this is the primary location of this Attorney's practice. As with any legal advice, the advise is general in character, and should not be put into practice without specifically consulting your local counsel, who will possess far more insight into the applicable standards and laws of your specific State, your case's specific issues and the local Rules of Court and practices of the specific jurisdiction your legal action is governed by. You are specifically instructed : Do not proceed without first discussing this matter with your own local Attorney. This Office does not provide free legal advice by telephone. A 15 Minute Consultation can be obtained at no cost for certain types of legal cases, but to obtain same, an Office appointment is required. Provision of the answers to general questions does not constitute an act of representation, and the Attorney shall not be deemed to accept employment based upon the responses contained herein. The reader is advised that they utilize the general suggestions contained in the responses at their own risk, and under no circumstances should they disregard the advise of their present local legal counsel based upon any suggestions or opinions contained herein. Also, the bast method to discuss a case with an attorney is to do so directly, by scheduling a formal consultation in their office, bringing with you at the time of the meeting all of your relevant paperwork, including any contratcs, any Orders from Court, decrees, complaints, pleadings, etc., and any other relevant information for the attorney to review. General information via the internet is no substitute for an actual meeting with an attorney. The advice provided on line in response to the limited information is provided without charge. It is also provided without the benefit of face to face discussions, so before you act--consult an attorney in person.

Mark as helpful

Family law topics

Recommended articles about Family law

What others are asking

Can't find what you're looking for?

Post a free question on our public forum.

Ask a Question

- or -

Search for lawyers by reviews and ratings.

Find a Lawyer

Browse all legal topics