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What are the chances of getting paroled in Texas when you have been revoked from parole and sent back to TDCJ?

Houston, TX |

I have a friend who served a 5 yr. sentence for agg. assault; served 8 yrs on a 10 yr sentence for robbery and was paroled; while on parole arrested for dwi, accepted plea bargain for 2 yr; was revoked from parole & sent back to TDCJ to serve the old sentence along with the 2 yrs running concurrent. He has served 10 months of his time and has 14 months until his release date. He has been interviewed by parole and is waiting for an answer. He held a job, passed all UA's, reported to PRO and attended AA with no other violations up until dwi. This all happened in Texas. What is his chances of getting paroled again?

Attorney Answers 2


  1. Best answer

    It is hard to tell as the parole board is currently reversing itself after granting parole in some cases as reported in the Houston Chron. Attached is the link regarding the reversal. His criminal history, adjustment in prison, disciplinary history if any, opposition to his release, and compliance with parole terms and conditions are all factors. He was doing well before his DWI. With 14 months left, you would think he would get paroled. Good luck.

    My answer is for informational purposes.


  2. Unfortunately as Ms. Wilson notes there is no way to know what the parole board will do. Given that he has several offenses and re-offended they might be inclined to keep him in, but if he has shown some growth since being re-incarcerated, they might be willing to give him a shot again. I am sorry that answers can't be more definitive, but that is the state of Texas paroles at this time.

    Although my intent in answering this question is to aid you in the legal process, my answer does not establish an attorney-client relationship in any way. You should seek the advice and counsel of a qualified attorney in your community to evaluate your legal needs and to advise you. No Attorney-Client Relationship is created without the specific intent of both parties.

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