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What are the chances for me to remove my conditions through I-751 waiver after a divorce?

Arlington, TX |

I do not have a lot of evidence of good faith marriage. I have joint medical insurance card, pictures before and after marriage, emails, chats, texts, short term joint bank accounts (savings, checking, credit cards) and affidavit of 2 people that known us since the marriage. We don't have utility bill, lease or property together.

Attorney Answers 5

Posted

The answer is very fact specific. As long as the marriage was not spurious, you should try. To do that, please hire an immigration attorney in TX and ask them to review your record. You may be glad, you did.

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Posted

As long as your marriage was bona fide, you should certainly try. You do not have as little evidence as you may think, but again these cases are very fact specific. Waiver based I-751 cases should be done with the help of an experienced attorney. Good luck!

This is not legal advice and a client attorney relationship is not created. For a free consultation call (718)234-5588.

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3 lawyers agree

Posted

It sounds like you are compiling good evidence for the waiver of the joint filing requirement. Of course, the more evidence you have, the better. Just because you don't have utility bills, lease agreements or proof of joint property ownership does not mean that you don't have enough evidence for a successful waiver. See an immigration lawyer who can look at all your evidence and determine whether you have a good case. Good luck!

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Posted

At least 50/50.

The above is intended only as general information, and does not constitute legal advice. You must speak with an attorney to discuss your individual case.

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2 lawyers agree

Posted

I agree with my colleague, this answer is very case specific. I highly recommend you seek a competent immigration attorney to assist you with this process. I'm located in TX and have worked on this type of case. If you wish to do so, you may contact me. Otherwise, please contact an experienced immigration lawyer. Some ways to find an experienced immigration lawyer is to look at their CV, AVVO profile, license, law graduation, etc. Best of luck.

No attorney-client relationship is created or implied by this communication in any way. Consult a competent immigration attorney.

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