What are my options if my Rolls Royce Phantom was damaged by a bitter employee while at the Rolls Royce authorized service shop?

Asked about 5 years ago - Beverly Hills, CA

I have a 2006 Rolls Royce Phantom which was purposefully damaged (dash board leather ruined, side airbag door leather ruined and seat leather ruined, and outside paint keyed in one spot) by a bitter employee while my car was in for regular service. I was told the employee was fired and that he damaged two other vehicles. I have tried dealing with management but they have not given me any satisfactory resolutions. What are my options?

Specifically, do I have to accept fair market value as a remedy considering I end up losing out on the $40,000 registration (tax and license) fees I paid, or am I entitled to some reimbursement of that as well.

Can I request the car be repaired and sue for loss of use during repairs? Also, how about the depreciation in resale value due to repairs?

Attorney answers (3)

  1. Kenneth Lewis Swenson

    Contributor Level 15

    Answered . Given the value of the vehicle and the very specific questions you have asked, you should consult with an attorney to discuss the particulars of your matter, to review your options and for any specific legal advice.

  2. Brian Richard Dinday

    Contributor Level 16

    Answered . Actually, you should be able to recover ALL of the damages you have mentioned, but you may not get it without a lawsuit. Unless............. I wonder how happy they will be if you start spreading the word about how they treat their customers' cars and their customers as well? You might ask them that question after demanding full compensation for ALL your losses. Your case is a shoe in, and I can't believe they are being this stupid. Their tone may change once you get a lawyer. I would not even be surprised if they have insurance to cover vandalism, so their attitude is even more surprising.

  3. Pamela Koslyn

    Contributor Level 20

    Answered . You left your car with this shop and as bailee, they're liable for these damages, including depreciation and lsos of use. Given the type of property and damages, there's no way they don't have insurance to cover this situation, although they may prefer to handle this outside of their insurance. A tsrongly worded letter from a lawyer should get you the result you're seeking.

    Disclaimer: Please note that this answer does not constitute legal advice, and should not be relied on, since each state has different laws, each situation is fact specific, and it is impossible to evaluate a legal problem without a comprehensive consultation and review of all the facts and documents at issue. This answer does not create an attorney-client relationship.

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