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What are my options for obtaining a copy of my lease?

Seattle, WA |

I have asked my landlord multiple times over the course of the last six months to provide me with a copy of my lease. I lost my original. I have called several times and am told it will be sent out but it never comes

Also I never did a move in condition report from them. They took my deposit but I never signed anything or recieved a request for a walk through.

Attorney Answers 2

Posted

If you request the lease in writing that may help but it was your responsibility to keep the lease that showed your rights and responsibilities.
The move in check list is governed by RCW 59.18.260 and that means the deposit should not be retained.
The receipt issue is covered by RCW 59.18.270 and you should have gotten a receipt.
Good Luck

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Posted

All notices between landlords and tenants have to be in writing. The issue about not having a copy of the lease has cropped up so many times that the legislature has codified it. Pretty sure it is in RCW 59 18 060. And I agree that they have no right to keep your deposit without a walk-thru checklist. There are other additional rules if you are in the City of Seattle. The City has a good website about this. Elizabeth Powell

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2 comments

Asker

Posted

Thank you for your response. I sent a letter on 6/21 requesting a copy of the lease. The letter was signed, dated and formatted much like the official notices that they send to tenants. I mailed a copy to the on site manager, and sent a courtesy copy to an agent at the office of the management company. I also placed a copy on the door of the onsite property manager. On 7/1 I received notice that there was a new onsite property manager. I met her and she seems much more capable than the last person. Today I received in the mail a letter dated 6/30 stating that my lease expired on 6/30/2012 and that I was being offered a chance to renew the lease for 6 months at an increase of $65 a month or go month to month for an additional $75 a month. The letter states that the offer expires on 7/15. The letter is not signed it simply has a stamp on the signature line hat says "Property management" This feels like retaliation. I would like to know what you think and if you have any ideas on how to respond?

Elizabeth Rankin Powell

Elizabeth Rankin Powell

Posted

Well, you have carefully laid down a paper trail that shows how difficult it was to get a copy of your lease. The RLTA requires that you receive at least 30 days notice of a proposed rent increase. Sounds like you got 1 day's notice. As the notice was not adequate, it cannot "expire" in 15 days. Retaliation is not the great answer that tenants think it is. The statutes are at RCW 59 18 240 and 250. What they say Is that if the tenant shows the adverse action came after the tenant made a valid complaint, then the tenant is entitled to their ACTUAL attorney fees. That is all. Strongly recommend you respond in writing, and point out that you did not receive 30 day's notice of this proposed increase. Then you want to look at the SMC (if you are in Seattle) as Seattle has additional rules about rent increases. E Powell

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