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Web Designer was paid 50% as down payment but disappeared

Los Angeles, CA |

We signed a contract about a website development: NDA + IP assignement and Total amount.

He overdue 15 days after the deadline and now I can't contact him any more by email and phone.

Also, he was always lying and late for in-person and phone meetings. So we had a conversation days ago and I proposed to him: Either he finish the project or refund the money, but we can't hold the money without any work done.

This web designer has a known public profile on the internet and it's very easy to track him on Facebook, Twitter and other social media. Also, I have information about this full time employer.

My question is: each webpage would cost $800, I paid $400 (I have the receipt, besides the contract). Is it worthy to take any legal action or should let it go.


Attorney Answers 3


Sue him in small claims court. Or have an attorney write a demand letter.

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As mentioned above small claims court appears to be your resource to recover what you paid. Demand letter also useful if the other side is in fact around and pays attention. Good luck.

In addition to AVVO's disclaimer, please note that by this answer no attorney client relationship is intended mor entered into and unless there is a signed retainer agreement in place, neither me nor anyone in our office has intended to solicit clients nor reprints them. The answers are general in nature and without weighing specifics of particular query. No answer should be relied on in whole or in part, directly or otherwise to act or not to act in pursue of any of your potential claims in law or equity. You should consult with and obtain advise or representation of an attorney to protect your rights regarding your case or matter.

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I agree with my colleagues:

Small claims court was designed for the type of dispute you have described.

This information does not constitute legal advice and does not establish an attorney-client relationship.

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