Used PFJ on aiding$abetting charge how long until it is taken off my driving record? PFJ is supposed 2be 3 years with no trouble

Asked 11 months ago - Raleigh, NC

I know the judge said to not get into trouble for 3 years on the PFJ or it might bring back the original charge, but I want to know when this will come off my driving record to reduce my insurance rates and also if there is anything that I have to do to have it removed from my record. I'm coming around on the 3 year mark and just want to be clear of the whole situation as soon as I can.

Attorney answers (2)

  1. William R. Hixson

    Contributor Level 10

    1

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    Answered . The way you've written your question is confusing, as it seems to combine several issues. I'm assuming you were granted a Prayer for Judgment Continued (PJC) for aiding & abetting charges within the last three years. You've selected a number of DUI related tags for your question, but you did not mention anything about DUI charges, asking only when the PJC will expire. To answer that question, you are correct in that a PJC will fall off your record after three years if there is no other violation. If the PJC is driving related, that is when your insurance rates would decrease as well. However, if you are facing any DUI charges, a PJC cannot help you at all.

    This response does not establish an attorney-client relationship between the questioner and any attorney... more
  2. Ernest Clarke Dummit

    Contributor Level 13

    2

    Lawyers agree

    Answered . If you got a PJC then you should not have had any insurance increases unless it was your third in a five year period. But it never falls off your record. It is a conviction without a Judgement entered. Thus it is a conviction, but no sentence.

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