SURROGACY: We are the biological/genetic Intended parents and we will be utilizing a Gestational Surrogate

Asked 11 months ago - Orlando, FL

SURROGACY: We are both the biological/genetic Intended parents (my eggs, my husband's sperm) and we will be utilizing a Gestational Surrogate to carry our embryos because I am unable to carry a child. What do we need to do to get our names on the birth certificate? Will the hospital add our name to the birth certificate? Would we need a pre-birth order prior to birth? How do we go about applying for a pre-birth order Any other advice would be helpful

Attorney answers (3)

  1. Robert Jason De Groot

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    Contributor Level 20

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    Answered . For this type of thing you definitely need to hire an attorney in your area. There are far too many things that can go wrong and you need to cover yourselves as best you can with a proper agreement.

    R. Jason de Groot, Esq., 386-337-8239
  2. Ophelia Genarina Bernal-Mora

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    Contributor Level 19

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    Answered . You should definitely seek legal counsel to draw up the appropriate paperwork. Please feel free to contact my Orlando office during regular business hours at 407-354-5223. I offer a free consultation and would be happy to speak to you. Congratulations by the way, what a very exciting time for you!

    You should consult an attorney for advice regarding your individual situation since every case is different and... more
  3. L. Maxwell Taylor

    Contributor Level 20

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    Answered . I reproduce the following provisions of the Florida Statutes by way of general information, not legal advice. I hope they will help you. 742.15 is in the body of this response, and 742.16 is in the comment following it.

    Please hire counsel in Florida to assist you with this. I am not licensed there, so don't take the provision of this general information as legal advice.

    742.15 Gestational surrogacy contract.—
    (1) Prior to engaging in gestational surrogacy, a binding and enforceable gestational surrogacy contract shall be made between the commissioning couple and the gestational surrogate. A contract for gestational surrogacy shall not be binding and enforceable unless the gestational surrogate is 18 years of age or older and the commissioning couple are legally married and are both 18 years of age or older.
    (2) The commissioning couple shall enter into a contract with a gestational surrogate only when, within reasonable medical certainty as determined by a physician licensed under chapter 458 or chapter 459:
    (a) The commissioning mother cannot physically gestate a pregnancy to term;
    (b) The gestation will cause a risk to the physical health of the commissioning mother; or
    (c) The gestation will cause a risk to the health of the fetus.
    (3) A gestational surrogacy contract must include the following provisions:
    (a) The commissioning couple agrees that the gestational surrogate shall be the sole source of consent with respect to clinical intervention and management of the pregnancy.
    (b) The gestational surrogate agrees to submit to reasonable medical evaluation and treatment and to adhere to reasonable medical instructions about her prenatal health.
    (c) Except as provided in paragraph (e), the gestational surrogate agrees to relinquish any parental rights upon the child’s birth and to proceed with the judicial proceedings prescribed under s. 742.16.
    (d) Except as provided in paragraph (e), the commissioning couple agrees to accept custody of and to assume full parental rights and responsibilities for the child immediately upon the child’s birth, regardless of any impairment of the child.
    (e) The gestational surrogate agrees to assume parental rights and responsibilities for the child born to her if it is determined that neither member of the commissioning couple is the genetic parent of the child.
    (4) As part of the contract, the commissioning couple may agree to pay only reasonable living, legal, medical, psychological, and psychiatric expenses of the gestational surrogate that are directly related to prenatal, intrapartal, and postpartal periods.

    History.—s. 2, ch. 93-237.

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