Suing two parties with HQ over 100 miles apart (District Court 100 mile rule?)

Asked over 1 year ago - Concord, NH

I'm taking a company to court in Concord , NH . There is a second party to the suit that I have called " a material aspect " of the civil action . While researching local court rules and the law , I came across something called the 100 mile rule . The second party resides in a location that is at least 100 miles from where the court is located . I have two choices then ? File in a district court that is closer to the second party , or file a separate lawsuit against the second party while citing the information from the first lawsuit ? This is a lawsuit involving employment , civil rights on the job ( race ) , and harassment / stalking / threats after being fired for taking the complaints to HR and VP of company .

Attorney answers (4)

  1. George Costas Andriotis

    Contributor Level 20

    5

    Lawyers agree

    Answered . You need to consult a local attorney to investigate and advise you as you really should have an attorney handle tis action.

    Call for a free consultation at 727-937-1400 or visit us on the Web at www.serviceandjustice.com.
  2. Christian K. Lassen II

    Pro

    Contributor Level 20

    5

    Lawyers agree

    Answered . If you have an employment discrimination lawsuit, you would first need to file a complaint with the EEOC and wait for a right to sue letter which takes 6 months, otherwise, the suit will be thrown out.

    Only 29% Contingency Fee! Phone: 215-510-6755 www.InjuryLawyerPhiladelphia.com
  3. Sagi Shaked

    Pro

    Contributor Level 13

    4

    Lawyers agree

    Answered . Must file with EEOC. You need to check with attorney handling discrimination claims.

    Sagi Shaked is a Florida Bar Board Certified Civil Trial Attorney. To schedule a free consultation, call (877)... more
  4. Robert Bruce Kopelson

    Contributor Level 20

    1

    Lawyer agrees

    Answered . First, you should talk to an employment rights atty before filing anything in court or with the EEOC. If suit is brought, I think you would likely want to have all defts in the same case so they can point at each other, so that you dont have to be deposed separately in 2 different cases, etc.

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