Should I worry?

Asked over 1 year ago - Palmdale, CA

I used to work in a pharmacy. I met this guy who offered me 700 dollars to get him six prescriptions which consisted of vicodin, soma, lorcet, Xanax, and flexeril. I got half the money up front and when I delivered them I got the rest of the money. I was fired from my job and about a week later a detective called me wanting to talk to me. I called him back twice but got voicemail. He hasn't called in about a month and a half and suddenly called me a few days ago he says he wants to meet me somewhere or he can come to my house? My question is do I have to talk to him? What does he want after 2 months. If he had a case wouldn't I have been arrested already. What should I do? I live In california. Will I go to jail? I already have to pay back the employer for the medications.

Attorney answers (7)

  1. Joshua Sachs

    Contributor Level 19

    12

    Lawyers agree

    Answered . Yes, of course you should worry. You are the target of a criminal investigation and the police are looking for you. Absolutely do not meet with or speak to any police officer and do not discuss this matter with anybody except your own attorney whose loyalty will be to you and to nobody else. Retain a good criminal defense attorney immediately, like first thing tomorrow morning if you have not done so already, and leave it to your lawyer to make contact with the detective.

    By the way, although nobody can possibly know for sure the answer to your question about what the detective wants, the realistic possibilities are that he wants to (1) prosecute you; (2) use you; or (3) both. My bet is on #3.

  2. Michael Raymond Daymude

    Pro

    Contributor Level 20

    9

    Lawyers agree

    Answered . Yes, you should worry. You need a criminal defense attorney -- at the very least a consultation with one. The detective is not looking to do you any favors but probably to build a case against you.

    I am licensed in California only and my answers on Avvo assume California law. Answers provided by me are for... more
  3. Shawn Michael Haggerty

    Contributor Level 15

    8

    Lawyers agree

    Answered . Yes, worry alot.

  4. David Mark Wallin

    Contributor Level 14

    8

    Lawyers agree

    Answered . You should only speak to your attorney. Never speak to law enforcement when you are a suspect in a criminal matter. If you want to speak to me, as a former Deputy D.A. I'm sure I can answer all your questions. 661-222-2253......David

  5. John M. Cromwell

    Pro

    Contributor Level 16

    9

    Lawyers agree

    Answered . Yes! Hire a defense attorney ASAP.

  6. William Gerhard Holzer

    Contributor Level 8

    7

    Lawyers agree

    Answered . I handled numerous narcotics cases as a prosecutor, and I can assure you the detective is not dropping by for a social visit. He is building a case against you. Cases involving narcotics investigations are often filed months after the crime occurred. This is pure speculation, but your case may have been reviewed by a prosecutor, who was unwilling to file charges without the detective interviewing you first. This would explain the delay. I "kicked back" plenty of cases to detectives when I was a prosecutor. You should consult with an attorney. I recommend calling any of the attorneys who answered your question. You can call me at 949 444 2870.

  7. David Joseph Parsons

    Contributor Level 10

    4

    Lawyers agree

    Answered . As stated by my colleagues, YES, you should worry. Seek the aid of a lawyer as soon as possible and absolutely DO NOT talk to this detective, even if he arrests you and takes you in for questioning. In fact, do not speak to anyone but your attorney.

    Second, AVVO is not confidential. Consider this carefully when posting questions.

    I am an attorney practicing in the Antelope Valley. I give a free initial consultation. Please feel free to contact me at 661-902-8176. Good luck to you.

    David J. Parsons
    www.parsonsatlaw.com

    For informative purposes only. The attorney does not contemplate an attorney/client relationship being formed... more

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