School zone speeding ticket cost

plead guilty or not guilty? which would be the lesser consequence? reply in 48 hrs, or wait for the date posted for court?

Lynbrook, NY -

Attorney Answers (3)

Eric Edward Rothstein

Eric Edward Rothstein

Criminal Defense Attorney - New York, NY
Answered

Without knowing your facts, I suggest you plead not guilty and then try to work out a deal for either no points or less points - this assumes you are guilty. The outcome of the ticket could affect your license. I have a colleague who is great at defending speeding tickets so feel free to contact me if you want his name and number.

Terri Beth Kalker

Terri Beth Kalker

Speeding / Traffic Ticket Lawyer - Flushing, NY
Answered

There's not a difference in consequence only convenience. The date on the ticket is an arraignment where you would say Not Guilty. Save time and respond the same by mail.

My office handles many such tickets in that court and always gets great results.

Law Office of Terri B Kalker
718-275-0780

Bradley K. Bettridge

Bradley K. Bettridge

Speeding / Traffic Ticket Lawyer - Riverhead, NY
Answered

I would disagree that there is the same consequence for pleading guilty or not guilty. If you plead guilty, you receive points on your license based upon how many mph above the speed limit you were going. This may result in license suspension and/or insurance increase. If you plead not guilty, they may offer you a plea bargain. This could include a plea of guilty to less points, which would have less of a negative impact on your license and insurance. I would also recommend hiring an attorney to appear on your behalf. On numerous occasions I have been able to plea bargain speeding tickets down to no point parking tickets.

DISCLAIMER: This answer to a short question is provided solely for general informational purposes and based on general legal principles and court practice. This answer does NOT constitute legal advice, create an attorney-client relationship, or constitute attorney advertising

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