Residency continuity and Reentry Permit

Asked 8 months ago - Atlanta, GA

Hello everyone,

I am planning to leave the US for a period of 2 years after completing permanent residency of 28 months, for personal reasons.

To keep the continuous residency requirement for citizenship, I am planning to return in less than 6 months every time. In case I am not able to come back, I am also planning to get a reentry permit for 2 years.

The questions I have is, does an application for a re-entry permit (form I-131) stop the clock for citizenship, even if I do come back every less than 6 months?

Thanks in advance for your opinion and/or suggestion.
Muthanna

Attorney answers (4)

  1. Carl Michael Shusterman

    Pro

    Contributor Level 20

    18

    Lawyers agree

    Answered . It doesn't stop the clock, but remember to qualify for naturalization, you must be a permanent resident for five years and you must be physically present in the U.S. for over 50% of the past 5 years.
    Please see

    Mr. Shusterman's (former INS Trial Attorney, 1976-82) response to your question is general in nature, as not all... more
  2. Alexander Joseph Segal

    Contributor Level 20

    6

    Lawyers agree

    Answered . No, it does not stop the clock, the application per se, I mean.

    The information contained in this answer is provided for informational purposes only, and should not be construed... more
  3. Kenneth Craig Dobson

    Contributor Level 9

    1

    Lawyer agrees

    Answered . Getting a Reentry Permit does not stop the clock, but remember that physical presence is an issue for naturalization. I suggest that you speak with an immigration lawyer about maintaining your permanent residency as well as the specific requirements for naturalization.

    Kenneth Craig Dobson has practiced immigration law for over eight years. Nothing in this response should be... more
  4. Ichechi Nkesi Alikor

    Contributor Level 9

    1

    Lawyer agrees

    Answered . No. The re-entry permit does not stop the clock for citizenship rather, it helps to ensure that your green card/residency is not considered abandoned especially if you stay outside the U.S. for a period of 6 months or more on single trip.

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