Renewing lease and landlord did not give receipts

Asked about 1 year ago - Forest Hills, NY

Hello,
I am a tenant in Forest Hills Queens NY. I have been living in the apartment I am currently in for a year. I signed a lease when we first moved in and my lease is up to expire.

I do not want to sign a renewal lease as I am not sure if I will be there a full year and am concerned about committing for a full year. Do I have any obligation under NY law to sign? Can the landlord take action against me for not signing? Can I be kicked out of my apartment for not signing? I would rather not say anything about possibly not being there for a full year as I am completely unsure if this other living arrangement I am hoping for will work out.

Also, my landlord always sends me a statement to pay rent however he has never provided rent receipts. How do you think I should proceed on this in light of having to currently renew my lease? Should I say anything or not say anything?

Thank you!

Attorney answers (3)

  1. Michael Niels Bruno

    Pro

    Contributor Level 11

    1

    Lawyer agrees

    Answered . Your landlord can request that you sign a term lease. Should you not want to he can move to have you evicted if you don't leave voluntarily. If he doesn't ask you to re-sign - you should examine the existing lease that you have to see what provisions are made if you hold over beyond the original term.

  2. Peter J Weinman

    Pro

    Contributor Level 18

    Answered . Your lease may dictate how your holding-over will work - as far as increased rent, etc. If not, you'll become a month-to-month tenant under the same terms. Are you paying cash? Maybe start paying by check or money order.

    I may be guessing or not licensed in your state. No atty/client relationship exists.
  3. Daniel Antonio Hernandez

    Pro

    Contributor Level 10

    1

    Lawyer agrees

    Answered . No, you can't be forced to sign a new lease if you don't want to. However, if you don't he can proceed to have you evicted. If you holdover, then the either the lease or statute will determine the rights/responsibilities of both you and your landlord.

    Call our office at 407-932-1650.

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