Real estate after a divorce. Am I required to meet my ex-wife's request for$ 6000?

Asked 2 months ago - Albany, NY

My wife and I divorced 3 years ago. She gave me $25,000 dollars for my part of the house on the basis that we would sell for 160,000 as this was the evaluation at the time. She took ownership for the house. She hasn't sold it. She has emailed me looking for 6000 as she's considering selling lower than 160000. Real estate prices have gone down since the divorce. She could live in the house, but chooses to live with her parents, and as such considers the expense of the house an imposition. Would I be liable to pay he anything? We have no children. Thanks.

Attorney answers (3)

  1. Steven P. Kuhn

    Contributor Level 13

    8

    Lawyers agree

    1

    Best Answer
    chosen by asker

    Answered . If your agreement said the house is worth $160,000 and she is buying you out for $25,000 (nevermind what the mortgage balance was at the time) and you transferred title and she paid you, it is a done deal unless for some reason you were to have your amount recalculated in the future (highly unlikely). Just ask her if she sold the house for $200,000 would she be sending you some extra money....I think not. It is what we call the risks of changes in value in any investment...stock, house, business, etc.

    If my response has been "helpful" or the "best answer" please indicate it. It is rewarding to know that my... more
  2. David Zaslavsky

    Contributor Level 19

    5

    Lawyers agree

    1

    Answered . As Mr. Kuhn stated, you have been paid out and she has no more claims against you.

    I am an attorney with over a decade of experience in Matrimonial and Family Law with offices in Brooklyn and... more
  3. Lawrence Allen Weinreich

    Contributor Level 18

    5

    Lawyers agree

    1

    Answered . Based upon your question, your ex bought you out at the market value at the time. That she did not sell at that time is her fault and she has no basis to ask you for return of any monies.

    This advice is not meant to create an attorney-client relationship and is a general anwer to the question posed.

Can't find what you're looking for? Ask a Lawyer

Get free answers from experienced attorneys.

 

Ask now

25,439 answers this week

2,937 attorneys answering

Ask a Lawyer

Get answers from top-rated lawyers.

  • It's FREE
  • It's easy
  • It's anonymous

25,439 answers this week

2,937 attorneys answering