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Quitclaim deed question

Denver, CO |

My friend quitclaim deeded her condo to me last year, without my knowledge. Now she wants to sell the condo and is asking me to sign documents back into her name. I am stunned that she did this and am wondering if I am held liable for anything. Should I sign the documents. I have no interest in her property and want to help her but how did she record all of this with the county if I didnt sign the previous contract or have knowledge of the contract?! I think she was hiding it from her ex husband. But I am not sure. Thank u for your answers. I am stumped and need to protect me

Attorney Answers 2

Posted

That is a rather rotten thing for your "friend" to do. The original quitclaim deed is not valid unless it is delivered to you, although since it was recorded it indicates to everyone else in the world that you are the owner of hte condo. Unless something happened, this shouldn't make you liable for anything so long as the HOA fees were fuly paid, but it is uncomfortable to be unknowingly drawn into the situation, particularly if she is engaged in defrauding her ex or her creditors.

Signing a quitclaim deed will remove the property from your name, but you might alway want her to sign something stating that you never received or accepted the prior deed and agreeing to indemnify you for any claims related to the property. My biggest concern is that her ex would learn that she was hiding the property by shifting it into your name and he might seek to bring some sort of claim against you.

You can reach Harkess & Salter LLC at (303) 531-5380 or info@Harkess-Salter.com. Stephen Harkess is an attorney licensed in the state and federal courts of Colorado. This answer is for general information only and does not create an attorney client relationship between Stephen Harkess or Harkess & Salter LLC and any person. You should schedule a consultation with an attorney to discuss the specifics of your legal issues.

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Posted

You need to consult with an attorney for sure. I am concerned about what has occurred while you "owned" the unit as a result of the quitclaim deed not from a liability perspective but from a getting dragged into court perspective. If you had no knowledge that the unit was quitclaimed to you, you have numerous viable defenses against any liability. Your "friend" needs to get a lawyer and your lawyer needs to make immediate demands to insulate you from any and all liability related to the condo.

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