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Question about accident caused by my friend

Naperville, IL |

My friend rented a car. He drove the car and I was in the car on the passenger seat. Due to snow the car skidded off the road and we had to get admitted in hospital. Now who is responsible for the medical bills? He drove the car.. and he only has medical insurance. The rental car company said they can cover the car's damages and not the medical expenses. He doesn't have a personal car insurance. So who is responsible now. What can be done in this case? Pls help as I really cannot afford to pay such a huge bill.

Additionally my personal car insurance doesn't have medical coverage. Pls provide your thoughts on this case. Thanks a lot

Another information : There is a LIS (Liability insurance) mentioned in the rental agreement and that's through my friend's corporate. Do you think that will help pay my medical bills?

Attorney Answers 7

Posted

If he was driving negligently, then he might be liable for your injuries. But you need to ask yourself if you are willing to sue your friend. The car insurance company is not responsible for your injuries.

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Posted

If your friend did not have liability insurance that would cover him, it is quite possible the rental car policy will not cover this. It sounds as if you have no real options since you have no medical payments coverage. The only thing you may wish to do is contact a lawyer who is local to you and handles personal injury matters. Depending upon what the rental policy says, it may very well have medical payments coverage, despite what they are teling you.

Good luck and hope you weren't hurt too badly.

Stephen L. Hoffman
Law Office of Stephen L. Hoffman LLC
Chicago, IL
773-944-9737
Email: stephen@hofflawyer.com
Website: www.hofflawyer.com
Blog: www.hofflawyer.com/blog/

This answer posted on Avvo is for informational and educational purposes only. There is no attorney-client relationship created or formed and you should not rely on this as legal advice. The suggestion is made that if you wish to protect your rights, you consult with an attorney immediately.

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Posted

You can make a claim under the uninsured motorist coverage on your policy. I can help you with this easily. Call me.

Joseph Younes
(312)372-1122

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1 comment

Stephen Laurence Hoffman

Stephen Laurence Hoffman

Posted

Although I beg to wonder if UM would kick in if there is coverage for the rented car.

Posted

Have a local personal injury lawyer investigate the rental policy.

Only 29% Contingency Fee! Phone: 215-510-6755 www.InjuryLawyerPhiladelphia.com

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Posted

As laws of course vary from state to state, you should immediately seek a free consultation with a local personal injury attorney.

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Posted

So often I am asked this question..."What medical expenses can I get from the insurance company now that we know the collision wasn't my fault?" This is really an easy question to answer, because state law dictates what you are entitled to. However, just because you might be claiming a medical expense doesn't mean that you automatically get the money for those medical expenses. It is still up to you and your attorney to provide the insurance company with the facts and evidence to prove the damage.

Under the law of the state of New Mexico and most other states, medical expenses must be reasonable, necessary and a direct result of the injuries sustained in the collision.

The medical expenses must be reasonable in price compared to charges made by othere health care providers in the same community. This can be easily proven, and our firm has the annually published medical fees to help prove the reasonableness of the charges.

The medical expenses must be necessary and needed because of the injury from the collision. No one would expect the insurance company to pay for a medical expense that you really didn't need. You are, however, required to mitigate your damage. That means that you are allowed to have diagnostic tests and examinations to determine whether you have an injury. If you have some pain that you didn't have before the collision, you are expected to take reasonable precaution to determine if you have an injury. If you ultimately determine that you don't have any injury, the insurance company will still pay for the cost of the examination and diagnostic x-rays and other tests.

The medical expenses must be a direct result of the injuries sustained in the collision. You can't ask the insurance company to pay for anything that their driver didn't cause. However, they must also pay for the aggravation of a previous injury. As an example, let's say that your leg already had degenerative problems because of your age. It really didn't cause you any problems before the accident, but the twisting of the leg in the accident required you to now have physical therapy and ultimately a surgery. You aggravated the degenerative condition so now you must have the extra medical care. This would be a valid claim against the insurance company. The medical records provided by your doctor should clearly indicate that the medical care was needed as a result of the collision. If it doesn't state this on the records, then you should contact your doctor or his/her staff immediately to determine what he/she believes was the cause of the injury in the first place.

Once you have finished all of your treatment, it is realitively easy to determine your total medical expenses. You need to use the retail price of the medical expenses, not the amount paid by your health insurance or the amount you paid as a deductible or co-pay. It is usually a simple addition of the charges.

Sometimes doctors will state that you need to get extra money from the insurance company for future medical expenses. An example would be a doctor stating that you need one physical therapy visit per month for a total of 12 more months. You would need to calculate the cost of each visit and multiply times the number of visits the doctor says that you need and you then have an additional number for future medical care. Again, the same rules apply to future medical expenses that apply to the past medical expenses. The future medical expenses must be reasonable, necessary and a direct result of the collision.

The AVVO response or other communication by Caruso Law Offices does not create an attorney-client relationship. Please call us at 505-883-5000 if you would like to discuss your case in more detail.

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Posted

YOUR FRIEND MAY BE AN INSURED UNDER THE RENTAL CAR POLICY. YOU MAY THEN HAVE TO MAKE A CLAIM AGAINST YOUR FRIEND FOR YOUR INJURIES INCLUDING MEDICAL EXPENSES.
YOUR AUTO POLICY MAY HAVE UNINSURED MOTORIST COVERAGE, SO YOU MAY BE ABLE TO RECOVER FOR YOUR INJURIES INCLUDING MEDICAL EXPENSES FROM YOUR INSURANCE COMPANY.

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Stephen Laurence Hoffman

Stephen Laurence Hoffman

Posted

If there is no med pay coverage, there may not be UM either. If there is, try a claim under that.

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