Purchased a car, and I've come to find that it's a different year, model, has a salvage title, and other things. Can I sue?

Asked 12 months ago - Oakley, CA

As the question states, I recently purchased a car, which according to the ad (That I saved) only needed the starter to be repaired, and that the year of the car was 1996. I checked out the car, in the evening, and everything seemed well, except for the starter which was already pointed out to me, so I was fine with that. We pushed to start and it ran strong. Upon getting it back from the mechanic, and running the VIN, I find out the car was in an accident that required welding, needs a wheel alignment, is a 93 not a 96, has a salvage title, among many other repairs that I could not see at the time. I've tried getting this person to give me my money back, plus cost of repairs, but they are avoiding me. I even found out the car isn't in their name. Can I sue for fraud, and/or anything else?

Additional information

Also, I never said anything about buying the car "as-is" as in regardless of what is wrong with the car, told to me or not, that I would buy it without a problem.

Attorney answers (3)

  1. Scott Richard Kaufman

    Contributor Level 20

    3

    Lawyers agree

    Answered . Breach of contract. Hopefully, it's less than $10,000.00 and if so, since it would be a small claims case, you go to small claims court, where the filing fee is only like $50.00.

  2. John Noah Kitta

    Contributor Level 19

    Answered . It sounds like you purchased a clunker. This could be a basis for recession, breach of contract, fraud, and unjust enrichment. If the damage is under $10,000 you could file a claim in Small Claims Court and get some quick effective relief. Above and beyond that you have to contact an attorney for representation.

    If you have found this information helpful, please let the attorney know by marking best answer. Thank you.... more
  3. Dmitry N Feofanov

    Contributor Level 12

    1

    Lawyer agrees

    Answered . Fraud galore. But the problem would be collecting, since the defendant is a private party.

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