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Need to access my 401K-A and my fund is telling me no. I am about to loose everything and I cannot access my money

San Diego, CA |

I need to withdraw funds from my 401K-A and my fund wont let me.

Attorney Answers 1


The purpose of your 401k retirement plan is to provide for your golden years. There are times, however, when you need cash and there are no viable options other than to tap your nest egg. For this reason, the government allows plan administrators to offer 401k loans to participants (be aware that the government doesn’t require this and therefore it is not always available.)

401k Loan Limits
In most cases, an employee can borrow up to fifty-percent of their vested account balance up to a maximum of $50,000. If the employee has taken out a 401k loan in the previous twelve months, they will only be able to borrow fifty-percent of their vested account balance up to $50,000, less the outstanding balance on the previous loan. The 401k loan must be paid back over the subsequent five years with the exception of home purchases, which are eligible for a longer time horizon.

401k Hardship Withdrawal
What if your employer doesn’t offer 401k loans or you are not eligible? It may still be possible for you to access cash if the following four conditions are met (note that the government does not require employers to provide 401k hardship withdrawals, so you must check with your plan administrator):
1. The withdrawal is necessary due to an immediate and severe financial need
2. The withdrawal is necessary to satisfy that need (i.e., you can’t get the money elsewhere)
3. The amount of the loan does not exceed the amount of the need
4. You have already obtained all distributable or non-taxable loans available under your 401k plan
If these conditions are met, the funds can be withdrawn and used for one of the following five purposes:
1. A primary home purchase
2. Higher education tuition, room and board and fees for the next twelve months for you, your spouse, your dependents or children (even if they are no longer dependent upon you)
3. To prevent eviction from your home or foreclosure on your primary residence
4. Severe financial hardship
5. Tax-deductible medical expenses that are not reimbursed for you, your spouse or your dependents
All 401k hardship withdrawals are subject to taxes and the ten-percent penalty. This means that a $10,000 withdrawal can result in not only significantly less cash in your pocket (possibly as little as $6,500 or $7,500), but causes you to forgo forever the tax-deferred growth that could have been generated by those assets. 401k hardship withdrawal proceeds cannot be returned to the account once the disbursement has been made.

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