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N400 - Working overseas after the fingerprinting step

Richmond, VA |

I filed for my citizenship based on having my GC for 10+ years. My N400 application went into the interview scheduling stage on 4/29, but at the same time there is something unexpected going on that I need some input on. I got an offer for a job that will move us to the U.K for the short term; we won’t be leaving for another 2-3 months. Will the move pose any problems if I fly in for my interview or the oath ceremony? I currently meet all the requirements and really hoping that all this gets wrapped up before we take off, but if it doesn’t, I am planning on filing the N-470 and simply coming back for the interview and the oath. We will still have our house here/primary residence, but I am not sure if me taking a job in the U.K will disqualify me or pose any problems. A

Attorney Answers 3


Look, these types of scenarios are best run by an immigration attorney, not on AVVO.

NYC EXPERIENCED IMMIGRATION ATTORNEYS; email:; Phone: (866) 456-­8654; Fax: 212-964-0440; Cell: 212-202-0325. The information contained in this answer is provided for informational purposes only, and should not be construed as legal advice on any subject matter.

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The short answer is, no, the job in and of itself wouldn't pose a problem as long as you meet all of the other requirements and it's, as you say, short term. It's best to speak with an immigration attorney, however, to review all the possible scenarios including whether you would even need an N-470.

Disclaimer: This answer is for informational purposes and does not take the place of a consultation with an experienced immigration attorney. This answer does not create an attorney-client relationship.

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I would recommend consulting with an immigration attorney regarding the risks involved with a green card holder leaving the United States before becoming a citizen.

The answer provided is for general information purposes and cannot be relied upon. In order to provide legal advice, one must engage with a live attorney; this answer does not create such attorney-client relationship.

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