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N-400 Part 6 Residences - what addresses should I list?

Roswell, GA |

The form asks to fill in all addresses for past 5 years. I had moved in January 2012 and set-up my primary residence as my mother's house. This is where where my car is registered, driver's license address, where I receive all my mail, etc. However, I'm also at school in state and rent a single room in a house close to my school.

I assume that I should only fill in my actual official residence which is my mother's address? After I moved in January 2010, I only submitted the AR-11 a few months later (July 2012) after I found out that it was immediately required. Hopefully, this will not be an issue? My current address on the AR-11 form is my mother's house.

Attorney Answers 3


  1. Depending upon all of the circumstances, it may be appropriate to expressly identify one address as a primary residence and to expressly identify another address as a temporary address while at school. It is best to err on the side of disclosure and accuracy, and this is particularly true where the USCIS may consider one's "residence" to be where a person actually dwells and sleeps at night, rather than where a person registers a car, receives mail, etc.

    Many details in immigration applications can be more complex than they seem, and can form traps for the unwary. It would be wise to engage an immigration attorney to address all of the relevant information for naturalization, including details about where you have lived over the last five years, in order to be able to advise you and assist you in the naturalization process.

    [Note: Consistent with Avvo policy, this communication is intended as general information and not specific legal advice, and this communication does not create an attorney-client relationship.]

    David N. Soloway
    Frazier, Soloway & Kennedy, P.C.
    1800 Century Place, Suite 100
    Atlanta, Georgia 30345 www.fspklaw.com
    404-320-7000 * 1-877-232-5352 * dsoloway@fspklaw.com

    [Note: Consistent with Avvo policy, this communication is intended as general information and not specific legal advice, and this communication does not create an attorney-client relationship.] David N. Soloway Frazier, Soloway & Poorak, P.C. 1800 Century Place, Suite 100 Atlanta, Georgia 30345 www.fspklaw.com 404-320-7000 * 1-877-232-5352 * dsoloway@fspklaw.com


  2. Jurisdiction over your application is based on where you actually LIVE, not what you list as a residence or reliable mailing address, also immigration sometimes runs background checks that will reveal other addresses, prompting questions.

    If these addresses are in the same immigration office area of control, the jurisdiction question isn't a problem (but it would be if you were going to school in Denver, for example). List both and explain.

    This answer provides only general information and may not be relied on as legal advice. For more information about immigration law and policy, please visit www.lichterimmigration.com or follow us on twitter (@lauralichter) or facebook, www.facebook/lichterimmigration. To find an immigration lawyer in your area, log on to www.ailalawyer.com. Listed attorneys have been members of the American Immigration Lawyers Association, the nation's premier bar association for immigration lawyers, for at least two years, comply with annual continuing legal education (CLE) requirements and carry malpractice insurance.


  3. your residencies in chronological order from the most current backwards. All, for the last five years.

    NYC EXPERIENCED IMMIGRATION ATTORNEYS www.myattorneyusa.com; email: info@myattorneyusa.com; Phone: (866) 456-­8654; Fax: 212-964-0440; Cell: 212-202-0325. The information contained in this answer is provided for informational purposes only, and should not be construed as legal advice on any subject matter.

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