My wife is asking for a "Proposed Decree" and we're filing an Uncontested Divorce. I don't understand...What do I do?

Asked over 3 years ago - Fort Bragg, NC

My ex and I agreed on everything on who gets what after our divorce. So with that understanding, I filed for an Uncontested Divorce. I sent her the divorce papers with a waiver to speed up the waiting period.She lives in Texas and I live in North Carolina. She's flipped the script now that I've spent money on the attorney to do the work and file. She's asking for a "proposed decree". Does that change the type of divorce to "Contested"? If not, what do I need to do? I'm deploying to Afghanistan in 30 days. I would really want to be divorced and have proof before I leave. I don't want to deal with financial issues with the government. Please help!! Appreciate it...

Additional information

Can she still sign the waiver that I sent her to fast track the divorce even though there is a proposed decree involved?

Attorney answers (2)

  1. John G. Miskey IV

    Pro

    Contributor Level 12

    Answered . The proposed decree probably refers to the proposed Divorce Judgment that you plan to ask the Judge to sign. There are forms and templates available. Thanks for your service.

    Our office schedules phone and office consultations to review cases concerning North Carolina legal issues. This answer does not establish an attorney-client relationship but is a response to a hypothetical scenario and should not be construed as legal advice.

  2. Andrew Daniel Myers

    Contributor Level 20

    Answered . The answer to your question depends on the terms of the proposed decree. A proposed decree is simply one of the documents that is required in the package of documents that are filed, Read it over. Either you do agree and the divorce is uncontested, or you do not agree and the divorce is contested and will have to be fought over when you return.

    I truly wish you the best.

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