My sister-in-law received a general denial petition in the mail from her son's father's lawyer. They went to child support court

Asked over 2 years ago - Snyder, TX

on July11, 2011 and he was wigen 2 wks to pay $3600 or he would be placed in jai. The general denial letter doesn't explain any of what he is denying. I have looked up many things but we are still at a loss. She does have a call into a lawyer but hasn't heard back yet. Any suggestions or ideas what this could mean?

Additional information

it actually stated Respondents Answer to Orginal Petition then further down said that respondent was filing a general denial but didn't state what he was denying. My sister-in-law wasn't the one that filed the petition it was the Office of Attorney General and it was to modify and enforce child support.

Attorney answers (2)

  1. Dana Joseph Stewart

    Contributor Level 10

    Answered . I don't think you are referring to the document your sister-in-law received by the correct name. If she received a general denial, that would mean she (your sister-in-law) has filed a petition and her son's father was named as the respondent (ie - the other party in the lawsuit). A general denial is just the name given to the response that he is required to file with the court. You sister-in-law probably filed a motion to enforce child support because her son's father is delinquent on child support payments.

    However, without knowing all the details, it's hard to tell you exactly what to expect next. Definitely contact an attorney about this. Best of luck.

    This answer is intended for informational and educational purposes only and should not be considered legal advice... more
  2. Christopher Jay Harding

    Contributor Level 15

    Answered . Also, if the child support office is pursuing the claim and he files a general answer, your sister-in-law is entitled notice of the answer (and hence a copy) as a party to the lawsuit. He is simply denying everything so that he cannot be defaulted. That means there is going to need to be a hearing unless he will agree to an order.

    This answer is intended for informational and educational purposes only and should not be considered legal advice... more

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