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My parents wont let me go to school.

Las Vegas, NV |

Is it legal. For my parents to not let me go to school.
its my senior year and i made a mistake. I snuck out and went to a party, and i got caught. But now theyre saying im not allowed to go to school because i didnt care about it by sneaking out. Theyre sending me to mexico for three months and are putting my chances of graduating very low. ? Can they take mynright to go to school away like this?

Attorney Answers 2

Posted

You need to talk to them and no more sneaking out, you caused the problem and they need to understand how much you need to graduate, they are probably concerned you are hanging with the wrong crowd and sending you to live with family in Mexico will correct this problem

My name is Stephen R. Cohen and have practiced since 1974. I practice in Los Angeles and Orange County, CA. These answers do not create an attorney client relationship. My answers may offend I believe in telling the truth, I use common sense as well as the law. Other state's laws may differ.. There are a lot of really good attorneys on this site, I will do limited appearances which are preparation of court documents it is , less expensive. However generally I believe an attorney is better than none.

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Posted

But my father doesnt let me go to school in mexico or take online courses. I was told that i was very important to at the least take the online courses. But he doesnt want to. I know i made a mistake but taking away my chance to graduate is not fair. They are not going to pay for my school fully. And i need to keep doing well in school to get any goverment help. why would the goverment help me if its going to look like i just skipped school for 90 days not caring about my education. I highly doubt they are going help someome with that on their transcript.

Stephen Ross Cohen

Stephen Ross Cohen

Posted

I am not your parent and you need to consult an attorney in your city.

Posted

No. Under Nevada law, each parent of any child between the ages of 7 and 18 shall send their child
to a public school during all the time the public school is in session. If you are absent from school one or more class periods or the equivalent of one or more class periods without the written approval of your teacher or the principal of the school unless you are mentally or physically unable to attend school you will be deemed a truant. You could also end up being classified as a habitual truant if you have been declared a truant three or more times within one school year. If you become a habitual truant, the principal of your school will report you to a school police officer or the local law enforcement agency for investigation and issuance of a citation. If your parents have been given notice of your truancy and fail to prevent any further truancy within that school year, they will be guilty of a misdemeanor.

Ms. Riley may be reached at 347-501-8042 during regular business hours, or anytime by email at: alexis@nyrileylaw.com. All of Ms. Riley's responses to questions posted on AVVO are intended as general information based upon the facts stated in the question, and are provided for educational purposes of the public, not any specific individual, and her response to the question above is not legal advice and it does not create an attorney-client relationship. Ms. Riley is licensed to practice law in New York. If you would like to obtain specific legal advice about this issue, you must contact an attorney who is licensed to practice law in your state.

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Posted

They went to a lawyer themselves. And told them about mexico. And she said since im still 17 they can do whatever they want. If theu want to send me to mexico they can.

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