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My employer is not abiding by the contract that I signed.

Brooklyn, NY |

I started working for my employer about 2 years ago. When i signed my contract it states that full time and part time are eligible for pay raises once that period comes. That is what is stated in my contract that I signed. They recently gave out raises, but I asked why i did not get a raise, and the answer was because I work part time. Is this legal?

Attorney Answers 3


  1. You could sue, but unlikely to win unless you are a member of a union or the contract specifies the amount of your raise or there is discrimination of a protected class. Maybe time to look for a new job, they may be sending you a message that you are not the rght person. You can also speak soth your employer about your job performance and if and when you will get a raise and how much?

    If this answer is helpful, then please mark the helpful button. If this is the best answer, then please indicate it. Thanks. For further information you should see an attorney and discuss the matter completely. If you are in the New York City area, then you can reach me during normal business hours at 718 329 9500 or www.mynewyorkcitylawyer.com.


  2. If there is a contract, and they breached it, you might have a legal action. However, what are your damages? The most important reason would be: why do they do it to you? Maybe, it's a form of discrimination...

    Att. number 917-885-2261 This advice does not create an attorney client relationship. No specific legal advice may be offered by the lawyer until a conflicts check is undertaken. Information sent through a web form or via email may not be treated as confidential. Please accept my apologies for spelling mistakes. Law Office of Alena Shautsova , New York Immigration Attorney http://www.shautsova.com Blog: http://www.russianspeakinglawyerny.com


  3. Unless you were discriminated against then you have no claim for breach of contract because saying you are "eligible" for a raise means there are no guarantees you will get one-- still completely discretionary by the employer in this situation.

    My answer is not intended to be giving legal advice and this topic can be a complex area where the advice of a licensed attorney in your State should be obtained.

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