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My condition green card was approved, can I travel and how about my permanent green card?

Los Angeles, CA |
Filed under: Green cards

I just received my conditional green card. It was approved after I was convicted of a misdemeanor in California (it is definitely a crime of moral turpitude but qualified under petty offense exception). I was convicted about 2 years before I received my condition green card. So my question is, can I travel internationally with this conditional green card? Also will I have a problem 2 years later, when I try to file I-751? I know I will still have to prove bona fide marriage, but question is specifically about the criminal issue. Any advice will be greatly appreciated.

Attorney Answers 3


  1. Best answer

    Since you received your conditional green card even with the USCIS's knowledge of the conviction, you should not be denied a permanent green card two years later based on this conviciton. You will have to send in with your I-751 an original court certified copy of the disposition and evidence of compliance with any sentence, even though you provided this already the first time. Ia gree with the other response that you should enter the U.S. in California if you travel abroad.


  2. Yes, but make sure to land in LAX as your first entry to the US upon your return. It will assure safe admission as CA follows 9th Circuit precedence on petty theft exceptions.

    You will not have any problems removing the conditions on your green card and obtaining the permanent one under the facts.

    Behar Intl. Counsel 619.234.5962 Kindly be advised that the answer above is only general in nature cannot be construed as legal advice, given that not enough facts are known. It is your responsibility to retain a lawyer to analyze the facts specific to your particular situation in order to give you specific advice. Specific answers will require cognizance of all pertinent facts about your case. Any answers offered on Avvo are of a general nature only, and are not meant to create an attorney-client relationship.


  3. It all depends on whether you revealed those convictions at the time you applied for the conditional card.

    J Charles Ferrari Eng & Nishimura 213.622.2255 The statement above is general in nature and does not constitute legal advice, as not all the facts are known. You should retain an attorney to review all the facts specific to your case in order to receive advise specific to your case. The statement above does not create an attorney/client relationship. Answers on Avvo can only be general ones, as specific answers would require knowledge of all the facts. As such, they may or may not apply to the question.

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