My car stolen which got into a hit and run with parked cars that same night.Police asked me to come to dept. do I need a lawyer?

Asked over 1 year ago - Washington, DC

My car was stolen by someone I met that evening. He went on to get into an accident with two parked cars - he fled the scene but left my car there! I filed a stolen car report in the morning and was then informed that they have my car and it was towed as evidence. They couldnt tell me more over the phone but asked that I come to their station. Should I get a lawyer before I talk to the authorities again? I may have been naive to trust someone I just met the same night but didn't think this would happen.

Attorney answers (5)

  1. Jeffrey Mark Adams

    Contributor Level 20

    2

    Lawyers agree

    Answered . You've contradicted yourself in this post. Don't add anything further. Speaking with and possibly retaining. An attorney might be wise.

    Personal injury cases only; I'm good at it; you be the Judge! All information provided is for informational and... more
  2. Lars A. Lundeen

    Pro

    Contributor Level 20

    2

    Lawyers agree

    Answered . I suggest you discontinue posting details on the Internet. The police will be suspicious of this scenario. Have you reported the stolen vehicle to your insurance company, if you have theft coverage in your comprehensive policy.? If you have comprehensive coverage, you need to advise your insurance company.

    Lying to the investigating police officer is a criminal offense, as is insurance fraud. To best protect yourself in this circumstance, I suggest you retain a criminal defense attorney to best advise you, after he or she is told all of the facts. You have a right to remain silent and not answer questions if you desire.

    Legal Disclaimer:

    If this information has been helpful, please indicate below.

    Mr. Lundeen is licensed to practice law in Florida and Vermont. The response herein is not legal advice and does not create an attorney/client relationship. The response is in the form of legal education and is intended to provide general information about the matter within the question. Oftentimes the question does not include significant and important facts and timelines that, if known, could significantly change the reply and make it unsuitable. Mr. Lundeen strongly advises the questioner to confer with an attorney in your state in order to ensure proper advice is received.

    This ans. does not create an attorney/client relationship.
  3. Mark William Oakley

    Contributor Level 18

    Answered . I have heard so many "likely stories" over my years, and the police probably have heard over a hundred times as many, that when a story--or explanation--either makes no sense, or causes me to ask many other questions (or requires a certain suspension of belief or common sense), then the chances that the truth is not being told increases exponentially. Maybe there really is an innocent explanation to your actions, but it will not be believed by the police. Here is what I am hearing which makes no common or logical sense, yet you expect to be believed: (1) you lent your jacket with your car keys to a complete stranger and you allowed him to walk out of a bar into the night alone while you stayed inside; (2) the stranger and the keys are gone for "hours" even though he was only going out for a smoke, but you made no move to go out and locate him or call the police; (3) your car is involved in some kind of accident which you know nothing about; (4) you do not report the car stolen until the NEXT MORNING ... because ... ?? How did you get home? Why didn't you call immediately? Who can you provide as believable alibi witnesses to (1) confirm you remained in the bar for "hours"; and (2) state where you were at the time of the accident with your car. If there's another likley explanation why there are no alibi witnesses, its time to get off the merry-go-round and remain silent. Let me suggest what the police already suspect: none of what you say happened; you drove the car and caused an accident; you fled the scene to escape being caught (perhaps you were driving drunk? worse?); and then made up this unbelievable story and even filed a false stolen vehicle report to save yourself from being charged. Now, here's the news: whether your story is true or not, you'll probably be charged for the reasons I've just outlined. Opening your mouth other than to state you decline to answer any questions without a lawyer present will almost certainly result in your making statements which will either get you convicted or will get you charged with making a false report and causing the police to engage in an unnecessary investigation about a false story. You need a lawyer.

  4. Christian K. Lassen II

    Pro

    Contributor Level 20

    1

    Lawyer agrees

    Answered . An attorney would be prudent.

  5. Arthur Collin Cherry

    Contributor Level 9

    1

    Lawyer agrees

    Answered . Speaking as someone who has tought at the law enforcement academy, yes you need representation before taliking to law enforcement in this situation.

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