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MOVING VAN SCHEDULED FOR EXACTLY 1 HOUR BEFORE EVICTION, WILL SHERIFF PROCEED WITH EVICTION?

Fort Pierce, FL |

EVICTION IS SCHEDULED ONE [1] HOUR BEFORE MOVING VAN IS SCHEDULED TO ARRIVE, WILL SHERIFF STILL PROCEED WITH EVICTION? OR WOULD SHERIFF BE AMENABLE TO NEGOTIATE LATER TIME IF HE IS CONTACTED? IF CONTACT IS AN OPTION, MUST IT BE AN ATTORNEY WHO CONTACTS SHERIFF? THANK YOU.

Attorney Answers 3

Posted

The sheriff operates on their own time table. Best if you give all the information including the written confirmation of the moving company's arrival to the sheriff with sufficient advanced notice so that they can digest the information and confirm it on their own. The writ of possession when posted usually has as number to call on it. You should call that number and find out where to supply the information and take down names and times for your communication. Be there when the sheriff is to arrive and have that documentation available them also. The worst that happens is that the sheriff moves the stuff to the street and an hour later your moving company removes it from the street.

The answers given are limited to the facts as given and presumed by the answer itself. Without seeing actual written documentation or having a conference to more fully explore the issues, this short answer has only limited application. Make sure to seek legal counsel and provide all documentation to get assistance in making informed legal choices.

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Posted

If you mean the eviction hearing, its unlikely the wheels of justice will turn that quickly. If you are planning to leave, you should let the judge know at the hearing and they will often give you 24 hours to get your stuff out.

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Posted

If you are the Tenant, you should contact the Plaintiff-Landlord or his Attorney if he has one.
Ask to negotiate for a little more time before the sheriff shows up.

If you are the Landlord, you can call the sheriff's office and ask to re-schedule.

No, you don't have to have an attorney representing you to talk to a deputy sheriff.

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