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Mother not married currently living father wants to leave state. Do we have to serve him or can she leave the state.

Aurora, CO |

Child is 2, mother proposed parenting plan to him, he refuses, last time she wanted to leave to go to another state, he served her forcing her to stay in the state. No agreement in place, no hearing planned. She needs to return to her parents in Montana to fully support herself on her own once she can her feet. Do we need to serve him relocation modification or can she just leave and let him serve her up there?

Attorney Answers 3

Posted

I personally would not recommend you leaving the state and heading to MT before filing something with the courts. Although you are free to do so if there is no injunction in place preventing you to leave the state without court or the father's permission, it looks REALLY bad to the judge and looks like you are absconding with the child and trying to alienate the father from the child. Be up front and serve him with the paperwork for relocation in advance and then hold on for the fight of your life, because CO generally frowns on relocation.

The information provided in this answer does not create an attorney-client relationship. If you are interested in his legal services, feel free to call Chris at (303) 409-7635 at his law office in the Denver Tech Center. All initial consultations are free of charge.

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Asker

Posted

He has never been a good father. He has been on leave for 3 months and still has asked for a daycare. He is making 6,000 a month and has left me to pay for daycare costs while working full time even though he could have had her. He has always been this way. It's been me as a single parent making hourly wage in a home for two parents. Will this be enough for Colorado to approve?

Asker

Posted

(Leave from work) vacation still gets paid

Christopher Daniel Leroi

Christopher Daniel Leroi

Posted

The Court looks at the best interests of the child - not necessarily who is the better parent. I agree that he sounds like a real piece of work. However, it will be an uphill battle regardless and I highly recommend the services of an attorney. This is your future that you are talking about.

Posted

Often a parent will leave with a child and then be served in the new state by the parent who was left behind. Colorado will have jurisdiction over children's issues under six months has passed after you leave this state. Your new state will not acquire jurisdiction until you have resided there for six months. What you really need to do is obtain expert legal counsel to assist you. As Mr. Leroi has pointed out, when there are two functional parents, CO frowns on taking a child away from one parent. Good luck to you.

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Posted

Something is missing in the facts provided. If Father previously served Mother with a, APR action, which kept her (well, not her, but kept the child) in the state, is that case still going on? Unless it has been dismissed, then there is still an injunction in place preventing either parent from taking the child out of the state. If the case went through to final orders, then the law of Colorado requires that Mother needs either Father's permission or an order from the court before she can make a significant change to the location (including moving a long distance within the state) of the child's residence.

www.karlgeil.com. This answer is provided as general information about a legal issue, is not legal advice specific to a particular case, and does not create a lawyer-client relationship with the person asking the question.

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Asker

Posted

No facts missing stated above everything was cancelled

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