Skip to main content

Marrying citizen

Washington |

Can I become a US citizen by marrying one even though it is a business arrangement?

i am a 33 years old guy i want to marry a women abroad for the purpose of immigration only how i can do it.

Attorney Answers 5


  1. A foreign national may become a lawful permanent resident and, eventually, a US citizen through marriage to a US citizen. However, you and your spouse must establish a bona fide marriage, meaning that you and your spouse must intend to establish a life together at the inception of your marriage. The Immigration Marriage Fraud Act of 1986, as amended by the Immigration Act of 1990, prohibits a person from seeking permanent resident status in the United States by marrying a US citizen solely to gain that status.

    An attempt to gain resident status without a bona fide marriage is marriage fraud. A finding of marriage fraud can lead to the denial of the issuance of an immigrant visa, refusal of admission as a conditional or permanent resident, the loss of resident status previously granted, and deportation from the United States. If you are found to have attempted or conspired to enter into a marriage for the purpose of evading the immigration laws, you could be forever barred from becoming a lawful permanent resident, regardless of whether you divorce and later wish to apply for a green card based on marriage to another U.S. citizen or lawful permanent resident, or sponsorship by a U.S. employer.

    For more information or to set up a consultation, please contact us at kbrown@globallawpartners.com or visit www.globallawpartners.com


  2. A foreign national may become a lawful permanent resident and, eventually, a US citizen through marriage to a US citizen. However, you and your spouse must establish a bona fide marriage, meaning that you and your spouse must intend to establish a life together at the inception of your marriage. The Immigration Marriage Fraud Act of 1986, as amended by the Immigration Act of 1990, prohibits a person from seeking permanent resident status in the United States by marrying a US citizen solely to gain that status.

    An attempt to gain resident status without a bona fide marriage is marriage fraud. A finding of marriage fraud can lead to the denial of the issuance of an immigrant visa, refusal of admission as a conditional or permanent resident, the loss of resident status previously granted, and deportation from the United States. If you are found to have attempted or conspired to enter into a marriage for the purpose of evading the immigration laws, you could be forever barred from becoming a lawful permanent resident, regardless of whether you divorce and later wish to apply for a green card based on marriage to another U.S. citizen or lawful permanent resident, or sponsorship by a U.S. employer.

    For more information or to set up a consultation, please contact us at kbrown@globallawpartners.com or visit www.globallawpartners.com


  3. In addition to Karol Brown's excellent answer, I would add that entering into a marriage arrangement solely for immigration purposes is also a federal crime for which EITHER the sponsoring spouse or the immigrant spouse can be fined or sent to jail. Even if the government is unable to prove marriage fraud under the immigration laws, they might still pursue criminal action against either party for the federal crime of making false statements on a government application, or find the immigrant inadmissible under misrepresentation grounds.


  4. No. Unless it is a bona fide marriage, it is considered to be marriage fraud and will subject you to civil and criminal penalties.


  5. You need to define "business arrangement." However, the answers above should provide you with the answers you probably did not want to hear. Marriages must be "bona fide" and the spouses must live together in a joint, shared relationship. USCIS applies traditional standards in applying their discretion. Marriages solely to circumvent immigration laws are unlawful and may subject both the US citizen and the alien to both civil and criminal penalties.

Divorce topics

Top tips from attorneys

What others are asking

Can't find what you're looking for?

Post a free question on our public forum.

Ask a Question

- or -

Search for lawyers by reviews and ratings.

Find a Lawyer

Browse all legal topics