Landlord says i cant play music in my apartment

Asked over 1 year ago - Brooklyn, NY

my landlord tell me i cant play music in my apartment is this legal

Attorney answers (4)

  1. Robert K. Erlanger

    Pro

    Contributor Level 13

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    Lawyers agree

    Answered . The landlord is probably making up this rule due to complaints from a hypersensitive neighbor (does your landlord have an apartment by yours?). I agree with the prior attorney's answer and add that you only need to be reasonable as to when and how loudly you play your music. While you should try to accommodate your neighbors, there is no reason for you to subordinate your life to the needs of a hypersensitive one.

  2. Peter J Weinman

    Pro

    Contributor Level 17

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    Answered . What does your lease say?

    My answer is for general purposes only and is not not intended to establish an attorney-client relationship, nor... more
  3. Brandy Ann Peeples

    Pro

    Contributor Level 19

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    Lawyers agree

    Answered . Your landlord cannot tell you how to live, and he cannot interfere with your right to use and enjoy the apartment the way you see fit. If your lease does not prohibit music, then you can play music.

    Of course, this comes with a caution: you can't play your music in such a way that it interferes with anyone else either. If you're causing noise disturbances to other tenants or other people where you live, then your music is too loud.

    DISCLAIMER: Brandy A. Peeples is licensed to practice law in the State of Maryland. This answer is being provided... more
  4. Steven Warren Smollens

    Contributor Level 20

    2

    Lawyers agree

    Answered . Dear Brooklyn Tenant:

    Your lease may directly address this subject and you did not mention if the music is from you playing an instrument or radio, TV, or other media.

    On top of all lease provisions dealing with noise, instrument playing, music playing, loud sounds, is also imposed the new New York City Noise Code, local zoning that may impact on use of a residential apartment in certain neighborhoods for rehearsals, music teaching and at home performances.

    You must know what you did to have the landlord approach you, and so, if you believe that your tenancy rights are violated by the landlord prohibiting lawful conduct and reasonable use of the apartment you should consult with an attorney.

    Good luck.

    The answer provided to you is in the nature of general information. The general proposition being that you should... more

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