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Is there anyway i can surrender my military benefits such as my GI BIll and separation pay and volunteer to get discharged. USMC

La Crosse, WI |
Filed under: Military law

I have not yet started MOS school and I recently have gotten engaged and would like to be home to live with my future wife. I have a job back home secured and it doesn't matter how i leave the Marines. I would be alright if i didn't have any of the benefits, I just want to get back to my life back home

Attorney Answers 3

Posted

My response would have been similar to Mr. Green's but after reading your comment to his response, I am glad you have decided to stay the course. Besides the financial benefits, the long term benefits (even if you only do a four year hitch) are substantial.

This post is for information purposes only and does not constitute legal advice, nor does it establish an attorney client relationship with Mr. Cassara.

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Posted

You need to seriously consider the implications of what you are talking about when you say it does not matter how you leave the Marines. If you end up with a less than honorable discharge you will have difficulties your entire life. You may need to talk with your chain of command about a Entry level Separation but you need to tread lightly.

As a personal note from a career officer... I guess you are not one if the few, the proud and have not learned much about honor yet.

This is for general information only. Nothing in this information should be construed as creating an attorney-client relationship nor shall any of this information be construed as providing legal advice. Laws change over time and differ from state to state. These answers are based on California Law.Applicability of the legal principles discussed may differ substantially in individual situations. You should not act upon the information presented herein without consulting an attorney about your particular situation. No attorney-client relationship is established.

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2 comments

Asker

Posted

I intend by no means of wanting to get a less then honorable discharge, I have talked it over with my family and fiance and I am doing my 4 years. They have just been having a hard time without me being there, and it kills me to see them struggle every day that I am gone. I do care about my honor but I would be willing to take a blow to my pride if it was for my family. Although I will not do something stupid just to get discharged (sorry if I made it sound like that) I was just searching my options and after all my research and discussion with my family I well more we because my actions do not just affect me anymore now that I am responsible for a family, have decided that the best thing is to stick through it. There is plenty of things the Marine Corps has to help my family and I out so ill be sure to take advantage of them. Thank you for the advice, Sir

Ryan Sweet

Ryan Sweet

Posted

It's a privilege to serve in the military. I concur that you made the commitment and the Marines will have programs to help your family, you'll have steady income and health insurance, serve your country, and after 4 rewarding years earn your Honorable discharge. However, if you bail on the commitment you made to your nation, that speaks very poorly of your character and you'll have difficulties going forward. There is no real way to get out voluntarily without doing significant damage to your reputation as a human. So, I agree with your mature decision to stick it out. Four busy years in the service will go by quickly. Good luck! *Not legal advice, and I'm not your lawyer.

Posted

Concur w/ Mr. Cassara and Mr. Green. Aside from the benefits, the intangibles that are a part of military service (to include an honorable discharge) will have significant meaning for you for the rest of your life. and will differentiate you from those who haven't served.

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