Skip to main content

Is there anyway an entertainment case can be pro bono?

Dallas, TX |

I am a film student planning to shoot a movie with my class. I presume legal representation will not be needed but I would like to have representation in place if needed. This is a low budget film, nonetheless we would like for your firm to be in place if representation is needed. Thank you!

Attorney Answers 5


  1. You're asking a great question, and at the right time. Is the film intended for public distribution, or only as a class project? If it's the former, you will want to avoid many of the simple pitfalls indie filmmakers encounter, such as making sure there aren't copyrighted materials in the background, and you have proper releases in place with talent. It will probably be difficult to have a firm represent you on a pro bono basis as there is a lot of legal work involved, and an attorney must always provide the same level of professional services whether or not they are being paid.


  2. Yes. There is a pro bono lawyer organization for the arts. http://www.vlany.org/legalservices/vladirectory.php If you are in Dallas as you listed, you should contact
    Texas Accountants & Lawyers for the Arts
    1540 Sul Ross
    Houston, TX 77006
    (800) 526-8252 (toll-free)
    tel: (713) 526-4876 x201
    fax: (713) 526-1299
    info@talarts.org
    www.talarts.org

    Good luck.

    I am not your lawyer and you are not my client. Free advice here is without recourse and any reliance thereupon is at your sole risk. This is done without compensation as a free public service. I am licensed in IL, MO, TX and I am a Reg. Pat. Atty. so advice in any other jurisdiction is strictly general advice and should be confirmed with an attorney licensed in that jurisdiction.


  3. The most important thing to a filmmaker is knowing that they indeed own the assignable rights in their project that they have created as an asset and can freely exhibit, sell or license it accordingly. This can only be achieved by having the right written contracts, releases and agreements in place to assure chain of title. If this is going to be your career and not just a hobby you should consider making an investment and hiring competent entertainment counsel to protect your interests and guide you. You will learn a great deal about your craft along the way as well. Good luck!


  4. Yes, definitely consult with Texas Accountants & Lawyers for the Arts so you can have your ducks in a row from the beginning. Even low budget films should have basic contracts in place with the actors, locations, key personnel, music rights, etc., and good representation regarding distribution if you are going to go that route. Also, as someone else stated, there can be copyright and trademark issues, as well as accounting issues if there is going to be any money made. You want to know your way around SAG if applicable.

    The Beverly Hills Bar Association put out a great book a few years ago, a legal guide for filmmakers, but I only recommend it so you have an idea of the issues. I don't advise that you try to do this yourself, especially if the film is ever going to be released.

    Good luck to you.

    If my answer was helpful to you, I would appreciate if you would mark it either "helpful" or "best answer" if you feel that applies, as AVVO gives us rating points based on feedback. Thank you! Please note that the above answer is not to be construed as legal advice. It is my personal opinion based on your question, and it was given without obtaining the detailed information that I would normally request in order to render comprehensive legal advice. I advise you to consult with a local attorney of your choosing to obtain specific legal advice. The fact that I answered your question does not create an attorney-client relationship between you and me.


  5. If making movies is going to be your career then you need to learn the business side of things. Read the book linked-to below and some of the others cited as well. Good luck.

    The above response is general information ONLY and is not legal advice, does not form an attorney-client relationship, and should NOT be relied upon to take or refrain from taking any action. I am not your attorney. You should seek the advice of competent counsel before taking any action related to your inquiry.

Entertainment law topics

Top tips from attorneys

What others are asking

Can't find what you're looking for?

Post a free question on our public forum.

Ask a Question

- or -

Search for lawyers by reviews and ratings.

Find a Lawyer

Browse all legal topics