Is there a time frame for the divorce decree to be signed and submitted??

Asked about 4 years ago - Newark, NJ

divorced well over two weeks and have not recieved decree from lawyer

Attorney answers (2)

  1. Elliot S Stomel

    Pro

    Contributor Level 14

    Answered . This is not uncommon. Your lawyer has probably submitted the proposed form of Judgment of Divorce to the Court under the "Five Day Rule." This is actually a more efficient way of handling these matters than how they were done many years ago. Basically, your attorney submits the proposed form of Judgment to the Court. A copy is also sent to opposing counsel. Your attorney requests that the Court sign the proposed form of Judgment if it meets with the Court's approval and there is no objection by opposing counsel within five days. The Court typically grants the other party more than five days (to take into consideration mailing time). Furthermore, the Court has many other things on its plate as well, and sometimes needs a little extra time to review the judgment before signing it. The judgment is then filed and returned to you attorney, who in turn, sends a copy to you. Be patient...It is not uncommon for these matters to take a few weeks.

  2. Ronald Glenn Lieberman

    Pro

    Contributor Level 18

    Answered . The judgment of divorce is signed the date the judge hears the grounds so you need to ask your attorney for the reasons for the delay.

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