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Is naming estate of myself the prper wording for my life ins. policy?

Salt Lake City, UT |

Policy will cover cremation which the executor will handle.

Attorney Answers 3


  1. Naming yourself or estate would lead to probate.
    Your circumstances and beneficiares would determine who the beneficiary
    would be.
    If you have one beneficiary-it could be that person or perhaps you should consider a trust
    to avoid probate.
    If it was sold by the funeral home and you have a contract with them for the death benefit-it could be the funeral home.
    See your estate planning attorney for advice.

    The answer given does not imply that an attorney-client relationship has been established and your best course of action is to have legal representation in this matter.


  2. My estate would work. As Attorney Pippen indicated, however, there may be better ways to handle this. If you are going to have other property/assets going through probate, it may not make much difference. You DO want to make sure that the rest of your estate planning is in order. A Will, if you plan to have a probate estate, and durable power of attorney forms for health care and financial matters. These should be prepared by an attorney to make sure they are done right.

    James Frederick

    *** LEGAL DISCLAIMER I am licensed to practice law in the State of Michigan and have offices in Wayne and Ingham Counties. My practice is focused in the areas of estate planning and probate administration. I am ethically required to state that the above answer does not create an attorney/client relationship. These responses should be considered general legal education and are intended to provide general information about the question asked. Frequently, the question does not include important facts that, if known, could significantly change the answer. Information provided on this site should not be used as a substitute for competent legal advice from a licensed attorney that practices in your state. The law changes frequently and varies from state to state. If I refer to your state's laws, you should not rely on what I say; I just did a quick Internet search and found something that looked relevant that I hoped you would find helpful. You should verify and confirm any information provided with an attorney licensed in your state.


  3. Yes. It may not get you the results you desire, but you can do it.

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