Is it illegal for my company to require I stay on the premises for lunch but deduct an hour from my pay?

Asked over 1 year ago - Fort Lauderdale, FL

I work at a company that provides we have to stay on the grounds for lunch. Much of it is "downtime" so to speak, however we are not allowed to leave and there is only one person per shift so should a phone call come in, we take it or tend to a client. Is this legal? We could theoretically get a full hour in even if constantly interrupted, we just can't leave.

Attorney answers (2)

  1. David C. Holmes

    Contributor Level 13

    3

    Lawyers agree

    Answered . This is a gray area under the federal overtime laws. Yes, the employer can require you to stay on the premises for lunch. However, you are supposed to be completely relieved of duties. The regulation states: "The employee is not relieved if he is required to perform any duties, whether active or inactive, while eating."

    You need to discuss your specific facts and circumstances with a local employment lawyer right away. You may have additional rights under state and federal law.

  2. Neil David Kodsi

    Contributor Level 8

    Answered . I agree with the previous answer and think there is a very strong chance that this is a violation of the Fair Labor Standards Act. Of course, I am assuming from these facts that you are not being compensated for your lunch break. If you are being compensated for this time, then the employer is within its rights to require you to stay on premises.

    You should consult a lawyer who handles overtime cases. I, along with many of the lawyers who handle these cases will give you a free consultation to go over the specific facts of your case and determine whether it has merit. If your case has merit, then most of us who practice in this area will not charge you any fee to pursue your case. We get compensated by seeking fees from your employer. I would be happy to talk with you further if you are interested. You can call me at 786-464-0841 or email me at nkodsi@ndkodsilaw.com.

    Mr. Kodsi is licensed to practice law in Florida, Georgia and North Carolina. His response to your question is... more

Can't find what you're looking for? Ask a Lawyer

Get free answers from experienced attorneys.

 

Ask now

30,404 answers this week

3,195 attorneys answering

Ask a Lawyer

Get answers from top-rated lawyers.

  • It's FREE
  • It's easy
  • It's anonymous

30,404 answers this week

3,195 attorneys answering