Is a Quitclaim Deed reversible?

Asked over 4 years ago - Miami, FL

...In other words, can the person relinquishing her interest on the particular property change her mind and take it back? Are there any conditions or exclussions to it's velidity once the document has been recorded? Thank you!

Attorney answers (2)

  1. Jeffrey Scott Goethe

    Contributor Level 13

    Answered . Once a properly executed deed has been filed in the official land records, you'll have a tough time having it set aside. Florida law is designed to give certainty to people who rely upon the land records, so there are not many reasons for someone to ignore a deed that has been recorded in the official records. Attorneys reviewing the title will look to make sure it was signed properly, that the legal description of the land is correct, and that the deed is in proper form. There are also a few ways to have a court determine that the deed should be set aside, but this depends on the specific facts of each case.

    Although it is unusual to be able to "reverse" a recorded deed, in rare cases it can be done with the assistance of an experienced attorney. You should see if you can find an attorney to sit down with you in person, review the facts, and then determine whether it is worth the time, expense, and effort to pursue the matter.

    My comments are not intended to establish an attorney-client relationship, are not confidential, and are not intended to constitute legal advice. Proper legal advice can only be given by an attorney who agrees to represent you, who reviews the facts of your specific case, who does not have a conflict of interest preventing the representation, and who is licensed as an attorney in the state where the law applies.

  2. Douglas Ron Coenson

    Contributor Level 14

    Answered . There are only a few select instances in which a deed can be revoked (reversed). In general they are: (1) if the deed is invalid (i.e not executed properly), or (2) the deed contains a legal provision that expressly states it is revocable (i.e. in the case of an Enhanced Life Estate). Should you have further questions, I recommend you show the deed to a real estate attorney to provide you with an answer specific to your situation.


    Douglas R. Coenson, Esq.
    coensonlaw@juno.com
    (561) 315-2120
    Jupiter, FL

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