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Is a collaborative attorney hired as a neutral or do they actually represent the client who pays them?

Dayton, OH |

I am in the process of a collaborative divorce. it seems anything i share or talk about is met
with "we are all neutral". is this the case of is the client represented?

Attorney Answers 3

Posted

It depends on what the contract says.

Generally, they are in fact neutral, representing neither side and attempting to mediate any disputes, or even avoid disputes altogether.

You can always ask the collaborative lawyer for an answer to this question in writing.

Best of luck.

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Posted

I suspect thus varies by where you are, but that may change with the new collaborative practice law that just passed. Where I am generally the attorneys do represent each party in the collaborative process, however they commit to not represent the parties in court if the collaborative practice breaks down. The process with a true neutral is mediation.

For informational purposes only; not intended to, and does not, constitute legal advice or a legal opinion.

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Posted

An attorney in a dissolution case must pick on client and should have a contract indicating that. Who is paying the bill doesn't matter. You should review your written contract with the attorney. Joint representation is often a bad idea. You may want to get your own attorney who is going to look out for your best interest. Good luck.

Attorney Chris Beck
Beck Law Office, L.L.C.
Beavercreek, Ohio
(937)510-6110 phone
attycbeck@gmail.com
www.becklawofficellc.com

The responses of Attorney Chris Beck to any questions posed on Avvo do NOT establish an Attorney-client relationship. Attorney Beck is available for private hire and consultation for a fee. Only after Attorney Beck is retained as counsel, or agrees to discuss this matter with you privately, shall he be legally deemed to be your Attorney. His responses herein are an attempt to assist persons temporarily based upon the very extremely limited amount of information provided by the questioner

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